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  1. Royals 5, Indians 2: Danny Salazars frustrating season continues, Indians fail to capitalize on opportunities in loss to RoyalsSun, 28 May 2017 03:20:57 +0000
    CLEVELAND: The Indians certainly had their opportunities but never could deliver the needed hit, wasting several scoring chances in a 5-2 loss to the Kansas City Royals on Saturday at Progressive Field.Led by Francisco Lindor’s solo home run in the first inning and Jason Kipnis’ RBI single in the third, the Indians took a 2-1 lead but were then held at bay the rest of the day. The Indians three times stranded multiple runners on base after the third inning, and all three times didn’t get a ball out of the infield.Facing Royals starter Jason Vargas (6-3), the Indians left the bases loaded in the fourth. Kipnis narrowly missed a grand slam down the right-field line with two outs but pulled it foul by a few feet. He then popped out to first base.The fifth and seventh innings ended with similar results. Jose Ramirez with two on and two out in the fifth popped out to second base. And with two on and one out in the seventh, Edwin Encarnacion grounded into an inning-ending double play.The Indians (24-23) finished the day 1-for-7 with runners in scoring position and left 10 men on base.“We’ve got to get a line moving and keep it moving,” Indians manager Terry Francona said. “It seems like at times we get runners on with two outs. Then you have to get a hit as opposed to giving yourself a lot of opportunities. “When you don’t cash in, it’s not that big [of a] deal because you’ll have the next inning, you’ll have another opportunity. When you don’t, it’s really glaring.”The Royals (21-27) threatened while facing starting pitcher Danny Salazar (3-5) and finished the job against the bullpen. With the Indians leading 2-1 in the sixth, Salazar gave up a double and walked two to load the bases and end his day.Boone Logan’s first and only pitch was lined back up the middle by Alex Gordon for an RBI single to tie it 2-2. Facing Nick Goody, Alcides Escobar then rifled a two-run double just over the head of Lindor to give the Royals a 4-2 lead. Mike Moustakas added a solo home run against Shawn Armstrong in the ninth for an insurance run.Salazar allowed four runs — three earned — on six hits and five walks, continuing his slow, frustrating start to the 2017 season, in which he now has a 5.50 ERA.The Indians could be nearing a move with Salazar to try to get him on the right track. A couple of weeks ago the club revamped his pregame routine in an effort to fix his first-inning issues, though the results haven’t been quite what they wanted. Next for Salazar could be a temporary move to the bullpen, which could be made a bit easier with Corey Kluber’s possible return to the rotation on Thursday. The club has yet to talk through that decision, though.“I still think he didn’t command the ball where he wanted to, and there’s those walks that are mixed in that really hurt, like the inning when he came out,” Francona said. “We got out of innings, there was traffic the whole time. “We’ll kind of put our heads together and see what’s the next best step for him because I think he’s probably searching a little bit, too.”Ryan Lewis can be reached at rlewis@thebeaconjournal.com. Read the Indians blog at www.ohio.com/indians. Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/RyanLewisABJ. More...
  2. Things to Do, May 28: Anna Dean tour; gardening for wildlife; ELP drummer at Kent StageSun, 28 May 2017 03:19:58 +0000
    Take a walking tour of Anna Dean FarmThe Barberton Historical Society’s popular annual Walking Tour of O.C. Barber’s Anna Dean Farm steps off at 1:30 p.m. at the Piggery, 248 E. Robinson Ave., Barberton. The tour will loop around the west side of the farm, including several barns and the Heating House. It’s free. For information, go to www.annadeanfarm.com.Learn about the wild critters of gardeningFor many gardeners, part of the fun is seeing what kinds of birds, insects and other wild critters visit your yard. Learn how to attract wildlife at the F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 330-865-8065. Catch performance by Emerson, Lake and PalmerTwo-thirds of the groundbreaking prog-rock trio Emerson, Lake and Palmer died in 2016: keyboardist Keith Emerson in March, bassist Greg Lake in December. Drummer Carl Palmer is on tour paying tribute to his bandmates and will play the Kent Stage at 8 p.m. Tickets are $27-$35 at 330-677-5005, www.thekentstage.com. More...
  3. Cavaliers notebook: Cavs coach Tyronn Lue ready to settle long-standing bet with Warriors coach Mike Brown, but Brown wont take the moneySun, 28 May 2017 03:15:43 +0000
    INDEPENDENCE: Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue might have three words to say to his counterpart, Mike Brown of the Golden State Warriors, when they see one another before the start of the NBA Finals on Thursday.Here’s the cash.“Mike, I owe him $100 from when I was a rookie,” Lue said Saturday afternoon at Cleveland Clinic Courts. “That’s all I ever know about Mike. I tried to pay him and he wouldn’t take the money so he says I always owe him. He’s always been a great guy.”So what happened exactly for an NBA assistant coach to get a heads-up on a young player?“Yeah, he was with the Spurs and I was with the Lakers and we had a little shooting contest and I lost,” Lue said. “He wouldn’t take the money so from now on 19 years in a row he always says, ‘You owe me $100.’ He won’t take the money.”The bet involved Lue’s ability to shoot and the Cavs coach was clear Brown didn’t beat him in a shooting contest.“He didn’t beat me,” he said. “I just missed some shots. He didn’t outshoot me, no.”The timing of the shooting contest might be a little foggy in Lue’s memory. Lue was a rookie with the Lakers in the 1998-99 season and Brown was beginning his professional career with the Washington Wizards.Brown said he hasn’t forgotten about the wager, though. “I’m glad he finally admitted that he owes me money because for many years he wouldn’t admit that he owed me money,” Brown said of Lue after the Warriors finished practice on Saturday. “He does owe me $100, and since he got his new deal hopefully he can afford to pay me now. I asked him many time for it but he’s denied it. He’s denied that the game ever took place.”Brown said he’s glad Lue is finally prepared to pay off his debt.“I think what it has to do with, it has to do with the fact he’s got a nice, long, fat contract with the Cavs and he realizes that he can finally afford to pay me the money that he owes me for the shooting game back in 2000 or whenever it was,” Brown said with a grin.Brown said he doesn’t remember any other details about the wager.“I don’t even remember,” he said. “That was back when I was in shape and a good shooter. He’d kill me now.”Friendly wager aside, mutual respect remains.“[I’ve] always been close to Mike and I like Mike a lot, respect him a lot, had a chance to work his son [Elijah] out a lot at Impact in [Las] Vegas over the summer, so Mike is a good guy and I like and respect him a lot,” Lue said.And the job Brown is doing with the Warriors as their acting coach with Steve Kerr sidelined for health reasons?“I haven’t gotten that far yet,” Lue said, “but I know he’s doing a great job.”Enjoying the rideThe two newest members of the Cavs came to Cleveland well after the season began with one goal — to collect a ring.Veterans Deron Williams (12 years), who came from the Dallas Mavericks, and Kyle Kor­ver (14 years), who arrived in a trade from the Atlanta Hawks, have never played in the NBA Finals, and Lue is happy to see them finally reach that goal.“It’s good to see great players like that and players who have been around the league for a long time get a chance to go to the Finals and actually come to our team and want to be a part of it,” Lue said. “And we make it for those guys. So I’m excited they’re going to be there, and you can see those guys being veterans and understanding the game, what we need from those guys and hopefully it shows in the Finals.”Teammate Richard Jefferson offered some advice. Family and friends, he suggested, should be kept at a distance so the players can focus.“You’ve worked 14 years and people have supported you so, yes, come to the game,” he said after Game 5 of the Eastern Conference finals. “But as far as having 10 people in your house, this is a one time when I would tell any human being to be as selfish as you possibly can be …”George M. Thomas can be reached at gmthomas@thebeaconjournal.com. Read the Cavs blog at www.ohio.com/cavs. Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/GeorgeThomasABJ. More...
  4. Indians notebook: Indians unveil Frank Robinson statue; Corey Kluber could return to rotation on ThursdaySun, 28 May 2017 03:15:31 +0000
    CLEVELAND: The Indians on Saturday celebrated Frank Robinson’s contributions to the game of baseball and unveiled a statue in his honor in the middle of Heritage Park.Robinson became the first African-American manager in the major leagues as a player-manager with the Indians in 1975. He also had a hall-of-fame career as a player, winning two MVPs, a Triple Crown and belting 586 home runs.But it was his role in integrating and bettering the culture of the game that stands as Robinson’s lasting impact on baseball.“Today is extra special because of the social significance, commemorating the role the game of baseball and one of its all-time greats played in affecting social change in our country,” Indians owner Paul Dolan said. “We welcome Frank Robinson and his family and all the special guests who are here with us today.”In attendance were many of baseball’s pioneers and all-time greats, including Hank Aaron. Jackie Robinson’s daughter, Sharon, was also in attendance.“Thank you to the Cleveland Indians, this city, the fans of the Indians, and to the Dolan family,” Robinson said. “It is a great day here. I didn’t think I would see this day, but it is wonderful to be here.”Robinson also joked that the statue looked good, despite what he gave the sculptor to work with.“It’s a great piece of artwork. I don’t know how you were able to do it with what you had to work with,” Robinson said. “Thank you very much for making me look good. I appreciate this day and I’ll enjoy it for the rest of my life. Thank you.”Coming attractionIndians ace Corey Kluber is close to returning to the starting rotation as he rehabs from a strained lower back.Kluber threw 47 pitches in a rehab assignment for the RubberDucks on Friday night and was so efficient he needed to finish his outing in the bullpen. He reported normal post-start soreness on Saturday, a positive sign that the back issue that has plagued him for most of the regular season should be behind him.The club has yet to finalize the plan but Indians manager Terry Francona said Kluber’s next start will be with the Indians and will most likely come on Thursday against the Oakland Athletics.“We have so many days off coming off after that point that I’d like to sit with [pitching coach Mickey Callaway] and the other guys and kind of map out what’s in our best interest, putting some parameters in place like just who we’re playing, the days off, all those things,” Francona said. “We haven’t fit all those things together yet, but he will pitch for us.”Kluber has dealt with back stiffness since at least his second start of the season against the Arizona Diamondbacks. He pitched through the discomfort until it became too much to handle in a start in the cold against Detroit earlier this month. For Kluber, he began to walk the line between playing through the pain and trying to push something to the point of possibly hurting the club, not to mention himself.“I think that’s obviously the point we got to,” Kluber said. “We tried for a while to kind of manage it and figure out ways to still be able to go out there and pitch and stuff. It kind of just got the point where, little by little, it got worse. It kind of got to the point where I wasn’t doing myself any favors, I wasn’t doing the team any favors by kind of guessing every time out how it was going to react.”When Francona took Kluber out in Detroit, he knew something was off.“When he came off the field in Detroit, when Mickey made that trip to the mound, he came off and he said, ‘This isn’t good,’ ” Francona said. “So when he came off the field, I went down into the tunnel with him and I could tell. It had just gotten to the point that something needed to be done.”Ryan Lewis can be reached at rlewis@thebeaconjournal.com. Read the Indians blog at www.ohio.com/indians. Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/RyanLewisABJ. More...
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