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  1. Things to Do, July 21: Lady Antebellum at Blossom; Festa Italiana in Falls; Little Mermaid, Forbidden Broadway, comedians on local stages; free outdoor musicFri, 21 Jul 2017 03:15:10 +0000
    Jam with Lady AntebellumThe annual Blossom parade of big country music acts continues with Lady Antebellum at 7:30 p.m. Hot young star Kelsea Ballerini opens. Tickets are $35 and up at livenation.com. Indulge in some Italian food Festa Italiana returns to Falls River Square Friday through Sunday, on Front Street between Broad Boulevard and East Portage Trail in downtown Cuyahoga Falls. The festival features a bocce tournament, grape stomping and lots of Italian food. Admission is free. For a schedule, go to www.festaitalianacf.com.Go under the sea in TallmadgeDynamics Community Theater opens its production of The Little Mermaid at the Tallmadge High School Auditorium, 140 N. Munroe Road, Tallmadge. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through July 29. $12, $10 seniors and students. www.dynamicstheater.com.Have a laugh at Rialto TheatreThe Rialto Theatre, 1000 Kenmore Blvd., hosts a comedy night with headliner Sam Tallent and local comics. The guffaws begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $7 at the door. www.facebook.com/events/1243569769102389/Check out local free concertsSome of the free outdoor concerts on tonight’s schedule:• Crush, 7 p.m. at Lock 3 with Snazzy Cats, www.lock3live.com. • Blue Lunch, 7 p.m. at Goodyear Heights Metro Park.• Liverpool Lads, 7 p.m. at Doylestown Bandstand, www.doylestown.com. • Medina Community Band, 8:30 p.m. Friday, Uptown Park Square Gazebo, www.medinacommunityband.org. Enjoy Forbidden BroadwayTheater nerds will also enjoy the long-running satire Forbidden Broadway, opening at 8 p.m. Friday and continuing through Aug. 12 at Western Reserve Playhouse, 3326 Everett Road, Richfield. Tickets are $16 adults, $14 seniors and students. 330-620-7314. More...
  2. GOP leaders plan Tuesday health vote; its an uphill climbFri, 21 Jul 2017 03:13:42 +0000
    WASHINGTON: Republican leaders pushed toward a Senate vote Tuesday on resurrecting their nearly flat-lined health care bill. Their uphill drive was further complicated by the ailing GOP Sen. John McCain’s potential absence and a dreary report envisioning that the number of uninsured Americans would soar.The White House and GOP leaders fished Thursday for ways to win over recalcitrant senators, including an administration proposal to let states use Medicaid funds to help people buy their own private health insurance. But there were no indications they’d ensured the votes needed to even start debating the party’s legislative keystone, a bill scuttling and supplanting President Barack Obama’s health care law.“Dealing with this issue is what’s right for the country,” said Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. He added, “It was certainly never going to be easy, but we’ve come a long way and I look forward to continuing our work together to finally bring relief.”As leaders tested revisions that might attract GOP votes, others began comparing the process with the trade-offs they scorned seven years ago as top Democrats pushed Obama’s overhaul.“It’s almost becoming a bidding process — let’s throw $50 billion here, let’s throw $100 billion there,” said Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. “It’s making me uncomfortable right now. It’s beginning to feel a lot like how Obamacare came together.”In a blow, the Congressional Budget Office said McConnell’s latest bill would produce 22 million additional uninsured people by 2026 and drive up premiums for many older Americans. Congress’ nonpartisan fiscal analyst also said it would boost typical deductibles — the money people must pay before insurers cover costs — for single people to $13,000 that year, well above the $5,000 they’d be expected to pay under Obama’s statute.“Many people with low income would not purchase any plan even if it had very low premiums” because of that exorbitant deductible, the budget office said.That dire outlook resembled one the office released last month on McConnell’s initial bill, which the leader had to withdraw as Republicans rebelled against it.Thursday’s report seemed unlikely to do much better to help win over balking moderate Republicans upset over millions of voters losing coverage and cuts in Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor. These included Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Susan Collins of Maine, Ohio’s Rob Portman and West Virginian Shelley Moore Capito.The GOP’s fissures have changed little for months.Conservatives like Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Texas’ Ted Cruz want to loosen Obama’s requirements that insurers cover numerous services and cap customers’ costs, and some want to cut spending for Medicaid and other programs. Conservative Rand Paul, R-Ky., is most interested in simply repealing the 2010 law. Moderates want to ease the spending reductions and leave consumer protections in place.“There’s a handful of folks who clearly have significant reservations” about backing the bill, said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa. “But they haven’t said no. They haven’t said yes either.” More...
  3. Longtime U.S. Rep. Ralph Regula dies at 92Fri, 21 Jul 2017 03:11:58 +0000
    Former U.S. Rep. Ralph Regula, who helped create what is now the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, was the father of the Ohio & Erie Canalway and played a key role in starting the Northeastern Ohio Medical University and Stark State College, has died.He was 92.Regula, a Republican from rural Bethlehem Township in Stark County, served 36 low-profile, high-impact years on Capitol Hill before retiring in 2008 as the longest continuous serving congressman in Ohio history.“He was a master at getting things done,” said his son Richard Regula, a Stark County commissioner. “He didn’t care who got the credit. He just got things done.”At the time of his retirement from the 16th District, it was estimated that he had funneled $450 million to parks, highways, hospitals and universities in Northeast Ohio thanks to spending more than three decades on the House’s powerful appropriations committee.Despite his influential position on the committee and being viewed as the dean of the state delegation, he worked with both sides of the political aisle and eschewed the limelight.“There’s been a lot of opportunity to do good things for people,” Regula told the Beacon Journal just before he left office in 2008. “That’s what it’s all about.’’Regula, who died Wednesday night, had maintained a low profile since his retirement.“Ralph was the model of a dedicated public servant,” said Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, a Republican. “Instead of being called a congressman, he preferred the term ‘representative to Congress.’ ”U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, a Democrat from Niles, said Regula was the first person to greet him on the House floor when he arrived 15 years ago in Washington, D.C.“His example of public service was one I strived to replicate, and his emphasis on getting the people’s work done and not getting distracted by petty political fights is something Washington would do well to remember today,” Ryan said.Early yearsRegula grew up on a family farm in Stark County and spent his youth milking cows. He never dreamed of entering politics.He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and was accepted into the U.S. Naval Academy, but got cold feet at the last minute.He backed out and ended up at Mount Union College, earning a bachelor’s degree in business administration.That’s where he met his wife, Mary. They had three children, Martha, David and Richard.He later received a law degree from Canton’s William McKinley School of Law and served as a solicitor in Navarre.Regula started his career as a teacher and principal in Stark County, was tapped to run for the Ohio Board of Education, and later served in the Ohio House and Senate.The school board race was the only one he ever lost.When U.S. Rep. Frank Bow of Canton announced his retirement in 1972, Regula viewed running for Congress as the next “evolutionary step.” PoliticsTwo moments early in Regula’s congressional career proved pivotal and helped solidify his position and reputation in Washington:• He offered early support for Gerald Ford to replace the disgraced Spiro Agnew, who had resigned as Richard Nixon’s vice president in October 1973 after a bribery scandal. • U.S. Rep. Tip O’Neill, a Massachusetts Democrat, House majority leader and later House speaker, took him under his wing.“He started building that bipartisan base and that’s why he was such a true leader and he got things done,” Richard Regula said.Getting things doneOne of those bipartisan efforts involved creating the 33,000-acre Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area.Regula worked with two Democrats — U.S. Rep. John Seiberling and U.S. Sen. Howard Metzenbaum — and got Republican Ray Bliss to persuade President Ford not to veto the legislation.He then used his appropriations position to earmark $200 million for park development and land acquisition.“John Seiberling conceived the park dream,’’ former park Superintendent John Debo once said. “And Ralph Regula ensured the dream would be realized.’’Regula also foresaw the creation of the Towpath Trail, which stretches more than 85 miles through Cuyahoga, Summit, Stark and Tuscarawas counties.“When we were kids, Dad would take us out to hike,” Richard Regula said. “He had the vision. I still remember him telling us, ‘Boys, this is going to make a great trail someday, a great park someday.’ ”In 1996, Regula got legislation passed to create the Ohio & Erie National Heritage Canalway.He also helped secure funding for the National First Ladies’ Library, which opened in Canton in 1997 and was run by Mary Regula.He also had a hand in the founding of the Northeastern Ohio Medical University in Portage County and Stark State College in Stark County.“He was a true visionary who could see not five years, not 10 years down the road, he could see 20, 30 years down the road,” Richard Regula said.Despite all the accomplishments, Regula never was interested in receiving credit.“His whole goal was to help the people of the 16th District, Ohio and the nation,” Richard Regula said. “He never changed. He was just a farm boy from Beach City, Ohio.”Rick Armon can be reached at 330-996-3569 or rarmon@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter at @armonrickABJ . More...
  4. Patience, humility and soul searching: Zak Huseins brother reflects on life as Akron police announce murder charges in 2015 slaying at pizza shopFri, 21 Jul 2017 03:11:52 +0000
    Sixteen security cameras now watch over the North Hill pizza shop where Zak Husein was shot to death in December 2015.New LED lighting brightens the darkness there after nightfall.Husein’s oldest brother, Ammar Husein, installed a security system that allows staff to buzz in customers picking up pies and buffalo wings while locking others out.Those investments may have been the simplest changes that Ammar, who owns the pizzeria, has made since Zak’s slaying.On Thursday — in the moments after Akron police announced they had made an arrest in Zak’s murder — Ammar stood alone in flip-flops and a New York Yankees baseball cap, facing a gaggle of reporters and explaining how Zak’s death had changed his soul.“I finally learned what my dad’s been trying to teach me, I guess,” Ammar said. “Unfortunately, this is the way I had to learn patience. Unfortunately, this is the way I had to learn to humble myself. Unfortunately, this is the way I had to seal a lot of holes that [were] in my life.”People in Akron who knew Zak — and others around the world who never met him — mourned his death by taking action, Ammar said. Water wells were dug in Zak’s name in Nigeria. Closer to home, the University of Akron — where Zak was a student studying international business — launched an annual event for Rise Against Hunger that has packaged more than 90,000 meals that have been distributed worldwide.“He was just another kid from Akron,” Ammar Husein said, referring to his brother the same way Akron’s most famous son, LeBron James, refers to himself. “And now he’s moving emotions around the world.”A kid from AkronShaquille Anderson was also a kid from Akron. Anderson is 23 now but he was the same age as Zak Husein —21 — on Dec. 7, 2015, when Zak was shot to death.One year to the date of Zak’s death, when both Akronites would have been 22, Anderson was convicted in Summit County Common Pleas Court of charges in eight robberies that occurred in 2016. Six of the heists involved a gun.Yet it took Akron police, working with the FBI, several more months to connect Anderson to the North Hill pizzeria robbery and Zak’s slaying.On Thursday, Akron Police Chief James Nice stood at a podium in front of downtown headquarters at a news conference to announce murder and robbery charges against Anderson, who is already incarcerated at the Mansfield Correctional Institution serving a 21-year sentence for eight robberies that occurred after Zak’s death.Nice acknowledged the Husein family’s pain, saying he knew they had “suffered so long” while waiting for answers.Detectives had been working on the case all along, just like they do with all open homicide cases, he said.Nationwide, police solve less than half of all slayings, Nice said. So far this year, Akron police have cracked more than 80 percent of its homicides, a number boosted in part by an arrest in an arson fire that left a family of seven dead in May.“All of our homicides are important,” Nice said. In 2015, after watching somewhat blurry security video of the pizzeria robbery, detectives wondered if Zak Husein’s killer might have been a woman because of the shooter’s short stature.The video shows Zak at the counter handing over money to a masked gunman. The gunman then shoots.In the days after the homicide, police posted an image captured from the security video and this terse statement to Twitter: “APD needs help identifying this scumbag. Shot this poor kid in cold blood AFTER he handed over the money!”Police on Thursday, 19 months later, declined to say specifically what led them to Anderson because the case remains under investigation.But they did say the FBI helped enhance the video to see it more clearly. That, paired with information they uncovered after chasing down tips, appeared to be key.Other crimesBut Anderson wasn’t going anywhere.He appears to have been in custody since August after leading police with the Gun Violence Reduction Team on a short car chase that ended when Anderson rammed a 2004 Ford Crown Victoria into a utility pole at South Arlington Street and Concord Avenue.Anderson tried to run from the scene, but he and a male passenger were arrested, according to media reports at the time. Police seized a loaded 9mm handgun from the vehicle.At the time, police said both men were suspects in five Akron robberies and one in Barberton.In the end, though, Anderson was found guilty of eight robberies, including ones at mobile phone stores in Akron and Dollar General in Barberton.Ammar Husein found out who police charged with his brother’s murder along with everyone else Thursday.The moment a reporter handed Anderson’s mug shot to Ammar, he recognized something:“Those eyebrows,” Husein said, studying the thick, wide brows that arch over Anderson’s eyes.In security footage of the shooting, the robber’s face is covered by a mask.“But you could see the eyebrows,” Ammar said. “And those are the eyebrows.”Zak and Ammar’s parents were too upset Thursday to attend the police news conference, said Ammar, who expressed sympathy for Anderson’s family, too, because he said they were also losing a son.The Husein family is Muslim, Ammar said, and Islam teaches forgiveness.Amar said he has forgiven Anderson for killing Zak, for causing him pain and for breaking his father’s heart.“But I can’t forgive my mother’s tears,” he said. “I don’t think she has stopped crying.”Anderson is a coward, he said.It takes courage, Ammar said, to be a working man like he is, to get up every day and go to a pizza shop, work long hours and get up the next day, even though it’s painful.“It hurts,” Ammar said. “But it hurts worse to be behind bars.”Amanda Garrett can be reached at 330-996-3725 or agarrett@thebeaconjournal.com. More...
  5. In uniform, off duty and big trouble: Summit County sheriffs deputy who ran CSI unit faces charges for raping a 26-year-old womanFri, 21 Jul 2017 03:10:23 +0000
    A Summit County sheriff’s deputy who ran the department’s crime scene investigation unit faces rape and other charges for the sexual assault of a 26-year-old woman in a sheriff’s vehicle.Antonio Williamson, 26, was off-duty at the time, but in uniform, a prosecutor’s spokesman said. Williamson was leaving a security job when the incident happened and did not know the victim before the assault, the spokesman said. He would not specify where the alleged incident occurred.Authorities said the incident happened in March. Akron police investigated, with cooperation from the Summit County Sheriff’s Office and the Summit County Prosecutor’s Office.A Summit County grand jury indicted Williamson on rape, kidnapping, gross sexual imposition and sexual battery, the prosecutor’s office said.Williamson turned himself in Thursday morning and is expected to appear in court Friday morning.Sheriff Steve Barry referred questions to Akron police and the prosecutor’s office. More...
  6. Cavaliers talking contract with Derrick RoseFri, 21 Jul 2017 02:55:36 +0000
    CLEVELAND: The Cavaliers could be adding another former Most Valuable Player to their roster.Looking to close the gap on the champion Golden State Warriors, the Cavs are in contract talks with free-agent guard Derrick Rose, a person familiar with the negotiations told the Associated Press on Thursday. Rose, whose career has been sidetracked by injuries, could sign a one-year deal for the veteran’s minimum, according to the person, who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the talks.The Cavs have salary cap issues and are limited in what they can offer Rose, who made $21.3 million while playing in 64 games for the New York Knicks last season.ESPN.com first reported the Cavs’ pursuit of the 28-year-old Rose. Other teams, including the Los Angeles Lakers, are interested in him.Although Rose is not the same player he was in 2011 when he was named the league’s MVP while with the Chicago Bulls, he can still score and would be another nice complement to LeBron James, a four-time MVP.The Cavs signed free agent Jose Calderon last month as a backup to All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving. Rose, if healthy, would be a better option than the 34-year-old Calderon.The Cavs struggled to fill the backup role last season after allowing Matthew Dellavedova to leave as a free agent after the 2016 championship.Rose has averaged 19.5 points and 6.0 assists since being drafted first overall by the Bulls in 2008. He was a three-time All-Star during his seven seasons with the Bulls. More...
  7. FirstEnergy Stadium in Cleveland might have flammable panelsFri, 21 Jul 2017 01:55:08 +0000
    In promotional brochures, a U.S. company boasted of the “stunning visual effect” its shimmering aluminum panels created in Cleveland’s FirstEnergy Stadium, an Alaskan high school and a luxury hotel along Baltimore’s Inner Harbor that “soars 33 stories into the air.”Those same panels — Reynobond composite material with a polyethylene core — also were used in the Grenfell Tower apartment building in London. British authorities say they’re investigating whether the panels helped spread the blaze that ripped across the building’s outer walls, killing at least 80 people.The panels, also called cladding, accentuate a building’s appearance and also improve energy efficiency. But they are not recommended for use in buildings above 40 feet because they are combustible. In the wake of last month’s fire at the 24-story, 220-foot-high tower in London, Arconic Inc. announced it would no longer make the product available for high-rise buildings.Cleveland’s chief building official said panels used on city-owned FirstEnergy Stadium are “similar if not identical” to those used at a London apartment tower that burned.However, Thomas Vanover also said he’s confident the Cleveland Browns’ stadium is safe.A spokesman for Cleveland’s mayor initially said questions about the stadium would have to wait until after the investigation into the London fire. But Vanover held a news conference Thursday and said the panels were installed on the stadium in a different way than in London’s Grenfell Tower, and that the venue’s overall cladding system was different.“If the materials used on a building appear similar to a known hazard, people need to know that,” said Douglas Evans, a fire protection engineer from Las Vegas, who has been studying fires on the exterior facades of buildings for nearly 25 years. “Anybody who is inside of these buildings has a right to know.”The International Building Code adopted by the U.S. requires more stringent fire testing of materials used on the sides of buildings taller than 40 feet. However, states and cities can set their own rules, said Keith Nelson, senior project architect with Intertek, a worldwide fire testing organization.The National Fire Protection Association conducts fire resistance tests on building materials to determine whether they comply with the international code. Robert Solomon, an engineer with the association, told the AP that the group’s records show the U.S.-made Arconic panels never underwent the tests. For that reason, he said, the group considered the products unsafe for use in buildings higher than 40 feet.Tests conducted by the British government after the Grenfell fire found samples of cladding material used on 75 buildings failed combustibility tests.Solomon said the use of Reynobond PE on the Baltimore Marriott and Cleveland Browns stadium in particular should be reviewed because of their height.On buildings that are “higher than the firefighters’ ladders,” incombustible material must be used, Arconic advises in a fire-safety pamphlet. It warns that choosing the right product is crucial “in order to avoid the fire to spread to the whole building” and that fire can spread extremely rapidly “especially when it comes to facades and roofs.”No one has declared the U.S. buildings unsafe, nor has the U.S. government initiated any of the widespread testing of aluminum paneling that British authorities ordered after the London disaster.The Arconic website stated that the Browns stadium used 100,000 square feet of the bright silver aluminum composite material in its exterior.One option for building owners who are unsure of the product’s use would be to remove a section of paneling and have it tested at a lab, said Vickie Lovell, president of InterCode Inc., a consulting firm on building codes and standards.For decades, the U.S. has required sprinkler systems to be installed in new high-rise buildings, as well as multiple ways for people to exit in the case of a fire. Grenfell Tower had none of those safeguards.But fire safety experts caution that indoor sprinklers can’t stop a fire that ignites on a building’s exterior and spreads across the coating that encases it. More...
  8. Summit County jury hears closing arguments in Fred Taylor murder case, will begin deliberations FridayFri, 21 Jul 2017 01:53:39 +0000
    Who shot Javon Knaff? Not Fred Taylor, Taylor’s attorneys say. Summit County prosecutors say he did and that Knaff answered “Fred” when asked who shot him while riding in the ambulance after his shooting on Memorial Day of last year. It will now be up to a Summit County jury to decide. The jury heard closing arguments in Taylor’s murder case Thursday afternoon and will begin deliberations Friday morning.Taylor, 19, of Akron, is charged with murder, felonious assault and having a weapon while under disability. If convicted, he faces 18 years to life in prison.Knaff, 23, was shot at a holiday cookout in a parking lot at the Rosemary apartment complex on Nadia Court in Akron. A witness testified that Taylor was the shooter, but defense attorneys argue that her view may have been obstructed and that one of the other young African-American males in the parking lot could have pulled the trigger. Family members of both Knaff and Taylor have attended the trial, which started Monday in Summit County Common Pleas Judge Mary Margaret Rowlands’ courtroom. More...
  9. Adults take drivers seat and steer Soap Box Derby cars during parents raceFri, 21 Jul 2017 01:52:57 +0000
    With a mouth guard in place and war paint smeared across his cheeks, John Denison tied a bandana around his forehead and snarled a menacing growl as his 12-year-old daughter, McKenzie, pointed her camera at him.Saturday is race day for kids, but on Thursday, adults got their shot at feeling the thrill of the hill in FirstEnergy’s All-American Soap Box Derby Parents Race.Denison was one of 81 adults who raced down the hill at Derby Downs Thursday afternoon in a series of 27 heats with three cars each. Heat winners advanced to the next round. There were four rounds in all.As Denison stepped into the adult-sized derby car at the top of the hill, he let out a brief scream of excitement.“I’m planning on winning right now. I ate a cheeseburger for breakfast,” Denison, 36, said confidently.Apparently, though, neither confidence nor cheeseburgers are the keys to success. Denison placed second and was eliminated.“It was awesome” despite the loss, Denison said as he squeezed his daughter with a hug. “I got to go down and experience what she gets to experience.”Derby leaders randomly drew names of kids from among the 370 children who’ll race Saturday to choose an adult representative for Thursday’s race. Most kids picked their parents, but others had uncles, aunts and even their regional derby directors in their place.Before the race, adults had the advantage of first-hand advice from seasoned racers — the kids. They advised the older folks of the basics — stay low and drive straight — along with other pro-tips they picked up along the way.“I told him the Warriors suck,” said 10-year-old Jonah Wooten, explaining that the reminder is a tradition he has with his father, John, when the roles are reversed. “It’s safe to say he’s the racer in the family,” John Wooten said after he lost his first race. “So the moral of the story is: Don’t do what I did Saturday.”Not even past experience at Derby Downs was enough to emerge triumphant. Roy Garren, 45, of Atlanta, raced in Akron in 1982, but even he was knocked out of the race in the first round on Thursday.Some friendly competition and the experience of flying down the hill, though, were enough to keep parents smiling throughout the day.“It was great. It brings back a lot of memories,” Garren said.In the end, Greg Cantrell of Bloomfield, Iowa, took home first place, cruising through the finish line and flashing a smile as derby officials handed him a trophy. Cantrell said when he was a kid, he tried for years to place in the national race in Akron, but he always came up short.“To come here and run down the Akron hill was absolutely amazing,” said Cantrell, 45, who was there with his 13-year-old nephew, Garrett Cantrell. “This is the best week ever for us right now.”Theresa Cottom can be reached at 330-996-3216 or tcottom@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @Theresa_Cottom . More...
  10. Class on civic education offers glimpse inside City HallFri, 21 Jul 2017 01:52:45 +0000
    Municipal leaders are accepting applications for the inaugural class of the “City of Akron Citizens Institute” — a program that will throw open the doors of city hall for curious residents to ask questions of officials and learn more about how city government works.“If residents don’t know or understand what is going on in the halls of their government, it can leave them feeling disconnected and disheartened,” Mayor Dan Horrigan said in launching the application process Thursday. “It’s our responsibility as government officials to engage residents by inviting them to the table, educating them about our rules and processes, and empowering them to give feedback.”Horrigan and his staff will choose about 25 residents eager to learn more about how Akron’s charter form of government creates and administers laws. Eligible applicants must live in Akron and be 18 years of age or older. Applications can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/2tu9Stx and returned no later than Aug. 15 to 166 S. High St., Akron, Ohio 44308. Letter should be addressed to Horrigan’s director of communications, Christine R. Curry, who can be reached at 330-375-2345 or Mayor@akronohio.gov.The aim of the civic-minded class, made possible by a $6,000 grant from the Knight Foundation and a $4,000 grant from OMNOVA Solutions, is to foster deeper engagement with the public through access and transparency. The course runs for 10 weeks from Aug. 29 to Oct. 24 with mostly Tuesday evening classes. The schedule includes a Monday class on Oct. 16 and a Saturday class on Sept. 16.The learning draws from a city government curriculum specially designed by Horrigan’s staff, members of which will be present with department heads and other city leaders to answer questions and engage the citizen students. “This program won’t be city leaders talking at residents, it will be a collaborative dialogue where both groups will learn from each other,” Horrigan said. “As leaders, we thrive on public feedback and need our citizens to be informed and engaged in order for us to serve them effectively. It is my hope that this pilot program will be successful and that we will be able to offer it to additional classes for years to come.” More...
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