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  1. ESFs may improve gestation feeding programs for sowsSat, 19 Aug 2017 05:00:57 +0000
    Electronic sow feeding systems have been able to monitor individual intake of gilts and sows housed together and could eventually improve feed efficiency. The post ESFs may improve gestation feeding programs for sows appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  2. Farm Science Review to enshrine Ernst, McFarlandFri, 18 Aug 2017 18:30:54 +0000
    Stan Ernst and Louis McFarland will be inducted into the Farm Science Reviews Hall of Fame. The post Farm Science Review to enshrine Ernst, McFarland appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  3. NRCS, WVU partner for mutual benefitsFri, 18 Aug 2017 05:00:47 +0000
    The Natural Resources Conservation Service has taken on three interns from West Virginia University Michael OConor, Addie Thornley and Mikenze Poling. The post NRCS, WVU partner for mutual benefits appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  4. 40 foods to enjoy as summer fades to fallFri, 18 Aug 2017 05:00:29 +0000
    Before the leaves begin to change, lets take some time to enjoy all the fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs that are in season and readily available. The post 40 foods to enjoy as summer fades to fall appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  5. Remember meThu, 17 Aug 2017 16:14:59 +0000
    Noah Cox was remembered as his best friend showed his steer at the Athens County Fair. Noah's steer won grand champion and has now raised more than $76,000. The post Remember me appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  6. Fishing in Kitty Hawk with the Bourlier’sThu, 17 Aug 2017 10:00:50 +0000
    Bob and Yvonne Bourlier took us to the Avalon Fishing Pier in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Pier is around 700 feet long, stretching out to the Atlantic Ocean and a webcam displays up-to-the-minute displays at avalonpier.com. (Submitted photo) The post Fishing in Kitty Hawk with the Bourlier’s appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  7. Roundup of FFA news for Aug. 17, 2017Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:59 +0000
    Two members of the Cory-Rawson FFA chapter earned their American FFA Degrees. The post Roundup of FFA news for Aug. 17, 2017 appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  8. Chicken soup is good for more than the soulThu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:54 +0000
    Chicken soup is loaded with immune-boosting vegetables and other ingredients that provide phytonutrients. The post Chicken soup is good for more than the soul appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  9. Pa.-based Kreider Farms now offers lactose-free milkThu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:52 +0000
    Kreider Farms, one of Pennsylvania's largest egg and dairy farms, has introduced America's first "farm fresh" lactose-free milk. The post Pa.-based Kreider Farms now offers lactose-free milk appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
  10. How to rid infected tall fescueThu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:50 +0000
    The recommended strategy for eradication of infected tall fescue is called spray-smother-spray. It's most effective when used over a period of about a year. The post How to rid infected tall fescue appeared first on Farm and Dairy. More...
Local Harvest
  1. The best corn in town!Sat, 19 Aug 2017 17:05:50 +0000
    Nothing is better in the summer than fresh picked, local, NON-GMO corn.  We have the best corn in town!  At least that's what our customers tell us!!!    We also have: Tomatoes Cucumbers Squash & Zucchini Eggplant Kale Swish Chard  More...
  2. How to make a Fabulous Felt ClothFri, 11 Aug 2017 10:40:55 +0000
     I am sharing detailed instructions on how I create fabulous Felt Cloth that I use for a variety of projects. Check it out !  https://artisticfarmer.com/2017/08/11/how-to-make-beautiful-felt-cloth/ More...
  3. Planning a Visit to our FarmFri, 11 Aug 2017 01:08:22 +0000
    Our farm, located on the scenic eastern shore of Maryland, is a popular place for tour groups and visitors. Folks enjoy the peaceful drive out to Preston, often coming from the nearby city areas to explore the Delmarva Peninsula for an afternoon or day trip, and we enjoy meeting new people and being able to share our love of these animals with guests. We offer tours by appointment, ranging from small groups all the way up to large charter buses, and we ask that you kindly contact us in advance to schedule your visit. What makes Outstanding Dreams Farm a popular destination? Our visitors enjoy learning about the farm, how we operate and care for the alpacas. Along with information and educational facts, we provide a chance to go out into the fields, meet and touch the friendly animals and see and feel their luxurious fiber. Don't forget your camera! One of the truly unique aspects of a visit to our farm is the Farm Store, which offers a wide variety of fiber products including a large selection of our own yarns. Items made from alpaca fiber range from plush toys and sweaters to socks and rugs, providing guests with a very different opportunity for shopping. The scenic grounds and pastures of the farm allow wonderful photo opportunities and plenty of space for parking and we have hosted groups such as vintage car clubs, motorcycle tours, garden clubs, agricultural students and many other parties as well. Where is the farm located? Situated just off Route 16 in Preston, we are just minutes from the towns of Denton, Federalsburg, Hurlock and Easton. Below is a map indicating the surrounding areas, and for those using a GPS our address is: 24480 Pinetown Road Preston, MD 21655. What's nearby? Our area is rich with local history, dining experiences, farms, shops, small towns, lodging at area Bed & Breakfasts, historical sites and outdoor destinations. A few highlights include: Linchester Mill (Preston) Suicide Bridge Restaurant (Hurlock) Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Cambridge) Adkins Arboretum (Ridgely) Classic Motor Museum (St. Michaels) Twilight Farms (Preston) How long should you plan on being here? While the size of the group is certainly one of the key factors, we generally recommend that visitors allow at least an hour to an hour and a half. Learning about the animals, seeing the various steps of the fiber in the processing shed, exploring the store and of course taking some photographs is an experience to be enjoyed and we encourage you to give yourself plenty of time to arrive. Interested in booking a group tour? Please visit our website to see more about our facility or email us here. We look forward to hearing from you and are eager to provide a wonderful experience to your and your guests! Outstanding Dreams Farm is located in Caroline County on Maryland's eastern shore, just a short distance from many of the area's best dining experiences, cultural attractions, historical sites and charming small towns. Our visitors love coming out here for tours, shopping at our farm store and of course to meet and greet the alpacas! See what's nearby and plan a day trip to the farm while enjoying some of the local flavor and area destinations. Sincerely, Phil and Vickie Liske Website www.OutstandingDreamsFarm.comFacebook https://www.facebook.com/OutstandingDreamsFarmGoogle+ https://plus.google.com/+OutstandingDreamsFarmPrestonTwitter https://twitter.com/odfprestonmdInstagram https://www.instagram.com/outstandingdreamsfarmPhone: 410-673-2002 24480Pinetown Road Preston, MD 2165 More...
  4. Yummy Honey Ice Cream!Tue, 8 Aug 2017 14:51:45 +0000
    79 YIELD: 1 quart INGREDIENTS 4 large egg yolks 2/3 cup honey 1/8 teaspoon salt 3 cups half-and-half or dairy mix* Optional infusions, add-ins or swirls see below DIRECTIONS Whisk together eggs, honey, and salt in medium bowl. In medium saucepan, bring half-and-half to a full simmer with any infusions. Remove from heat. Refrigerate until completely cool. Process custard in ice cream maker according to manufacturer's instructions; add soft ingredients such as 1/2 cup sliced bananas or raspberries half way through freezing, or chunky ingredients like nuts or candy during the last 2 to 5 minutes. Transfer to bowl or tub, add any desired swirls and serve, or cover and freeze until firm, at least 3 hours and up to 3 days.  Recipe courtesy of the National Honey Board. I like to make this using our Butterbee honey, my pet name for our Florida Keys variety that has a butterscotch influence, a contribution of the Black Mangrove nectar that makes it so yummy! It's a low viscosity honey so it's much easier to dissolve in liquids than a really thick honey.... Add-ins: Half way through the churning add up to 1 cup of fruit. Or, during the last 2 to 5 minutes add 1/2 cup nuts, bits of pure honey comb or chocolate bits.https://honey.com/recipe/homemade-honey-ice-cream-master-recipe More...
  5. Great Day at the MarketSun, 6 Aug 2017 11:44:06 +0000
    We had a awesome day at the weekly Farmers Market in Austin TX. Thank you to all that came out and visit with us. You made our day a special one. See you all again next Saturday. More...
  6. 2017 - We are continuing on.Wed, 2 Aug 2017 15:08:57 +0000
    We are still in operation.  It has been a busy year with family and health issues but it looks like we have made it past the hard stuff.  Cheese and soap classes are picking up.   We have a mobile app that is being worked on.  Look for it to debut sometime in September, hopefully.   The herdshare is also still running.  There are currently 3 spots open.  We are only doing morning milkings.  If you think you might want to move to evenings once you are trained, let me know early so I can figure out how to make it work.  We are not currently taking any milk for you clients. We are adding the sale of organic chickens to our activities.  We have also added 2 Red Burbon Turkeys. Hopefully they will be content and not make too much noise or wander too far as they get older.  We'll see.  The fun never ends.   Don't forget our farm tours can be used as birthday party activities.  We have had several people schedule those this year.   If you find me on Local Harvest but move to my website, be sure to mention you found me on Local Harvest so I can give them their portion of your support to our farm.  Local Harvest is also a small business trying to make ends meet and they do a fabulous job of keeping a good list of places to go across the country to stay connected to our food.  Thanks, Local Harvest! More...
  7. Gayle N. of Pasco WA is the winner of July's art contest!Tue, 1 Aug 2017 14:00:40 +0000
    Gayle N. of Pasco WA is the winner of July's art contest! More...
  8. Another processing day on the farmWed, 26 Jul 2017 15:22:25 +0000
    It's a warm and humid (wet actually) day here on our farm just north of West Concord Minnesota. We're processing about 70 broilers and a few of our Minnesota's Poulet Rouge chickens today. The chickens are doing better in the warm, humid conditions than we are! The year old laying hens have been moved to their summer house that includes about an acre of woods for them to roam through. They love to scratch through the leaf litter and search for hidden gems such as grubs and worms. The main hen house has been cleaned and sanitized for the next group of 800 young (beginners) laying hens that should arrive by the first week of August. Everyone looks forward to the "peewee" size eggs that they give us for the first month or so of their egg laying career. Sales have been brisk for us at the St. Paul Farmer's Market downtown on Saturdays. We look forward to seeing old friends and meeting new customers who eventually become friends too.   More...
  9. SUMMER VEGGIESMon, 24 Jul 2017 19:59:33 +0000
    LOTS OF SUMMER NON-GMO VEGGIES THIS WEEK. SUMMER SQUASH JUJUBEES GREEN BEANS BUY 2 CUKES GET 3 FREE I AM MAKING a VEGGIE STIR FRY WITH OUR BOK CHOI AND G-FREE PASTA AND WIS CHEESE CURDS COME TASTE! ALSO MAKING MY VEGAN VEGGIE DRINK WITH THE LOCALLY MADE KOMBUCHIA ORGANIC CHICKEN AND BUFFALO ALWAYS FOR SALE! PLUS OUR LOCALLY MADE CLEANING PRODUCTS ALWAYS A BIG SELLER1 OPENED THIS SAT 1 to 4  FREE HERB FOR THE PICKING WITH ANY PURCHASE! SEE YOU ALL SAT!  More...
  10. Michigan MilkweedsSun, 23 Jul 2017 03:07:39 +0000
    The decline of the Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus) was both boom and bane to the Native Plant industry. This iconic insect brought 'Monarch Watch' to international prominence, fostered 'Save Our Monarchs' and 'Project Milkweed' campaigns. As Marlin Rice, Professor of Entomology at Iowa State University noted: "It's sort of the Bambi of the insect world." Public awareness of Pollinators in Peril also propelled what before was a Green Industry niche into the mainstream. Native Plant Nurseries exclusively selling state or regional genotypes are seeing double-digit increases in sales. For the U.S. overall, native plants represented 17% of total Green Industry sales in 2013. Economic reality and public demand now dictate a Garden Center or Nursery offer native species with Milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) an obvious inclusion. Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) will certainly be included in this perfunctory 'Native Plant' order. Both are probably sold with little or no consumer interaction; either could be the consumers first Native Plant purchase. The result in many cases is an overall negative view of Native Plants. Regrettable for a genus with wholesale environmental benefits and species able to thrive in adverse settings. As every farmer knows, Common Milkweed is a colonizing species, perfect for naturalization a native meadow or pollinator ditch planting. This is a robust species adaptable to a wide range of soil, light, and moisture conditions. But planted in the perfect soil of a formal garden, its 6" deep creeping rhizome becomes a yearly reminder of a purchase gone bad. Sweet scented Swamp Milkweed is a moisture-loving Milkweed native to a wide variety of moist and wet environs. It is also an excellent background plant in mesic to mesic-wet full-sun settings with height dependent on available moisture. But this species should come with a product warning: like the Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata), new growth is an aphid magnet. Our customers have embraced this penchant as an alternative to pesticides. With pair of scissors, kleenex or garden hose and their bi-weekly visual inspection, aphid infestations are controlled at the onset, either discarded with the yard waste, wiped or sprayed away. Make room in your garden for Butterflyweed's (Asclepias tuberosa) long-lasting striking red-orange to yellow-orange bloom and quality as a cut flower. Though adaptive to all soils including loam or clay if they are well-drained, the preference is full sun, mesic to dry conditions in an acidic soil that is sandy or rocky. Butterflyweed will bloom the first year if started early, may take 2-3 years to truly become established, and does NOT transplant well due to its deep taproot. This species performs markedly better in bare, uncovered ground so lightly mulch if you must. Since crown rot can be a problem, plant away from emitters if you have a drip system. Butterflyweed is the 2017 Perennial Plant of the Year. Monrovia has introduced Butterflyweed cultivars blooming burnt orange and 'Gay Butterflies' with blooms of red, orange, and yellow. This is in addition to their red-lavender Swamp Milkweed cultivar and, yellow and red Tropical Milkweed cultivars. Most importantly these cultivars still posses the same benefits to pollinators. I have created a place for Whorled Milkweed's (Asclepias verticillata) delicately leaved stems and later white bloom in my clay-loam woods. Though tolerating moist garden soils and part-shade, the preference is full sun, mesic to dry conditions in coarse soils. Though the lower leaves may turn yellow and fall off or the foliage of the entire plant become yellowish in times of drought, Monarch caterpillars prefer this species in my garden. I consider Whorled Milkweed mildly colonizing though not invasive. And do not grow if you have grazing animals being one of the more toxic Milkweeds. Like Whorled Milkweed, Clasping Milkweed (Asclepias amplexicaulis) and Green Comet Milkweed (Asclepias viridiflora) thrive in full sun, but even drier sites (mesic dry to dry) again preferring poorer soils. Clasping Milkweed is a beautiful alternative to Common Milkweed for sandy, dry gardens. With alternating pairs of purple highlighted clasping leaves and a more open and deeper pink bloom, it does not disappoint. A little tricky to establish but worth the effort. Green Comet Milkweed is not for everyone having an inconspicuous bloom and declining rapidly post-bloom. It is a 'Bragging Rights' species perfect for name-dropping when in bloom on those impromptu but planned garden tours! The Milkweed star of my woodland garden is Poke Milkweed (Asclepias exaltata). This attractive tall-growing milkweed has dark green glabrous leaves and drooping clusters of bicolored flowers borne on individual stems. Native to woodland openings and edges, the preference is part, dappled or bright shade, mesic conditions, in a rich sandy loam liberally supplemented with organic matter. It will take two years to establish its deep taproot, becoming a multi-stem 3-5' tall plant with a 2' spread. I find this species the perfect overplanting to mark spring ephemerals since foliage is slow to emerge. Choose sites which offer protection from prevailing winds. I also grow two non-native Milkweeds onsite: Purple Milkweed (Asclepias purpurascens), a northern Indiana genus compliments of Chad Hughson at Kalamazoo's Hidden Savanna Nursery; Tropical Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica) when I can find it offered locally. Purple Milkweed is less aggressive than Common Milkweed with a desirable deeper color purple bloom. It is still a colonizing species and should be planted contained in formal gardens. Purple Milkweed will adapt to heavier clay loams and tolerate light / bright shade. Monitor during drought for wilting and do not hesitate to apply supplemental water. You may know the problem with Tropical Milkweed the presence of OE or Ophryocystis elektroscirrha, a parasite whose only hosts are the Monarch and Queen Butterfly. This is not a problem in northern climes where the plant is grown as an annual; it is recommended that gardeners in Zones 7-11 cut plants back to the ground a couple times each season allowing new and OE free foliage to emerge. Being a succulent, Tropical Milkweed is an aphid magnet requiring weekly monitoring and the occasional hosing to dislodge an infestation. But this species is 'Chocolate Cake' to Butterflies and blooms continuously to the frost. I religiously deadhead specimens to maximize the bloom since it will seed & flower simultaneously. Milkweed (Asclepias) Facts: I recommend buying healthy plugs early in the season or specimens in gallon containers. If you start from seed, losses the first season can exceed 25%. It's not you frost-heaving is a death sentence to young Milkweeds. Milkweeds love sand. For all I have a supply of builders sand onsite for potting seedlings and created micro-climes +50% sand with compost and fine / sifted wood chips, elevated for drainage in my improved clay-loam. Acidify Butterflyweed's mix using pine chips, sphagnum &/or an acidic compost from Pine / Oak / Beech rather than Maple. In formal gardens or when planting a Milkweed Garden, consider digging-in and planting colonizing Milkweeds Common; Purple; Sand within a bottomless 2800cm / 5gal nursery container. Once mulched the edges disappear solving the problem of escape! ALL Milkweed species are considered poisonous All parts poisonous. Toxic only in large quantities. Symptoms include, vomiting, stupor, weakness, spasms. Toxic Principle: Cardiac glycosides & resinoids. (Poisonous Plants, NC State University) Milkweed is the sole food source of Monarch caterpillars and the Milkweed Tussock Moth (Euchaetes egle) who are immune to and use the toxins ingested with the leaf matter as a defense mechanism. For the same reason, ALL MILKWEED SPECIES ARE DEER RESISTANT. Persons with sensitive skin should always wear gloves when handling Milkweed spp. Wash your hands thoroughly when finished, normal precautions when handling any plant material. If you suspect Milkweed sap in your eyes either directly or indirectly from sweat or hand to eye contact, seek medical attention immediately! Do not ATTEMPT to drive yourself! Asclepias spp. produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity Asclepias spp. to varying degrees . . . . . Attracts all pollinators including Butterflies and Hummingbirds Of special value to Native Bees, Bumblebees, and Honey Bees Supports Conservation Biological Control - attracts predatory or parasitoid insects that prey upon pest insects (The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation) Confirmation arrived Mid-July that this property is an 'Urban Oasis' residential pollinator-friendly habitats with the goal of creating Native Bee habitats and corridors for migrating butterflies. Our first Monarchs in two seasons have taken up residence, returning hourly to the Milkweeds and blooms and bog. Evidently they have nowhere else to go . . . . . a leaf cutter bee is nesting in a wallstone crack, floating in the cats water dish a couple times each hour and refusing to use the nesting box . . . . . 'Mr. BeeBalm' (Snowberry Clearwing Moth - Hemaris diffinis) returned with the Monarda spp. and Coneflower bloom . . . . . except to this City yard. Lynnette Fouch Bugenske Owner, BetterFinds LLC Monarch Waystation #1657 of 17,145 - (as of 17 July 2017) If you're planning a Pollinator Garden, my most-shared hyperlinks: From the Michigan State University Extension: Protecting and Enhancing Pollinators in the Urban Landscape MSU Extension Bulletin E3314 Attracting Beneficial Insects with Native Flowering Plants Extension Bulletin E-297 - Excellent introduction to Natural Enemies, both Predators and Parisitoids, and 'Bloom Progression', planning so that something is in bloom throughout the growing season. I DO NOT RECCOMEND planting listed species Wild Strawberry - Fragaria virginiana and Canadian Anemone - Anemone canadensis, being perhaps too aggressive for a residential planting. Butterfly Plants by Wildtype's Bill Schneider, reviewed and revised by Brenda Dziedzic, author of Learn about Butterflies in the Garden - Not only a list of Native Plants that serve as larval hosts for butterflies and skippers but includes a separate listing of Nectaring Plants. As for Brenda's book, a Butterfly picture book for children 5 to 105. Patricia Sutton's How to Create a Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden is a masterpiece! More...
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