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Inside Gwinnett
  1. Black women picking up firearms for self-defenseMon, 24 Jul 2017 09:07:17 GMT
    In this May 27, 2017, photo, Marchelle Tigner, a firearms instructor, goes over a firearms safety tips during a class in Lawrenceville, Ga. Tigner's goal is to train 1 million women how to shoot a gun in her lifetime. More...
  2. Black women picking up firearms for self-defenseMon, 24 Jul 2017 09:07:16 GMT
    Tigner's goal is to train 1 million women how to shoot a gun in her lifetime. She is... . More...
  3. Work starts on 860-lot subdivision partly in South HallMon, 24 Jul 2017 03:04:14 GMT
    Juan Ramos, right, and Jesus Barajas, of A.L. Grading Contractors of Buford, work on an underground pipe Friday morning at the future site of the 860-home Del Webb at Chateau Elan subdivision in Braselton. The main entrance into Reunion Country Club in South Hall was cut in half a few years back by the new four-lane Friendship Road/Ga. More...
  4. Gwinnett County man accused of killing wife has first court appearanceSun, 23 Jul 2017 22:32:49 GMT
    Walter Lowe sat quietly in a green jail jumpsuit Sunday morning with his recently hired attorney by his side, while being read his charges. "Mr. Lowe, you've been charged with aggravated assault, with murder and with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon," a Gwinnett County judge said. More...
  5. Suspect in Decatur motel murder being held in Georgia, pending extraditionSun, 23 Jul 2017 22:32:48 GMT
    At approximately noon on Saturday, the Morgan County 911 Center received a call reporting a deceased person at the Quality Inn in SW Decatur. Officers with the Decatur Police Department's Patrol Division as well as the Violent Crimes Unit responded to the scene at 2120 James Dr. They arrived to find the body of 22-year-old Tiara Alexandra Cole of Lawrenceville, Georgia. More...
  6. SwampBats Notebook: Elliott has solidified Bats rotation, lineup loses EikhoffSun, 23 Jul 2017 13:39:38 GMT
    S wampBats pitcher Tim Elliott came to Keene this summer wanting to prove to himself that he was still a starting pitcher. The righthander from Loganville, Ga. More...
  7. Gainesville to weigh plans for 65 townhomesSat, 22 Jul 2017 22:04:23 GMT
    A Buford-based homebuilder is looking to get almost 22 acres rezoned to develop 65 townhomes on South Enota Drive in Gainesville. The request by JH Homes to have the property rezoned residential will be taken up by the Planning and Appeal Board on Aug. 8. Previously, the property was zoned in 2003 for medical and professional offices, according to the city's planning staff. More...
  8. Massage turns into child molestation in LilburnSat, 22 Jul 2017 17:36:45 GMT
    In June, a mother of an 11-year-old boy took her son to get a massage from Hernandez after straining a muscle due to sports. The massage did alleviate the strain and a couple of weeks later the mother scheduled another massage with Hernandez. More...
Gwinnett County News
  1. County to host hiring event for Police and 911 on August 5 and 6Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT
    The Gwinnett County Police Department is currently hiring for 104 vacant police officer positions and 27 vacant communications officer positions. GCPD will hold a hiring event on August 5 & 6, 2017, at the Gwinnett Police Training Center located at 854 Winder Highway in Lawrenceville. The event will run from 8:00am to 6:00pm both days. Walk-ups are welcome, but we recommend applicants visit www.gwinnettpolicejobs.com to preregister and begin necessary paperwork. This will speed up the process for applicants once they arrive. Applicants for police officer and communications officer positions attending the event will complete a large portion of the hiring process on the same day and should plan on spending a few hours at the Training Center. Police applicants will participate in an orientation session, physical fitness assessment, and panel interview. Police applicants should bring athletic attire and business attire; facilities are available to change clothes. Communications applicants will participate in a data entry exam and panel interview. Communications applicants should wear business attire. Why Gwinnett Police? Time - All applicants are subject to a thorough background investigation. The department’s goal is to complete the hiring process in 90 days or less, which is already significantly faster than many Metro Atlanta police agencies. Most applicants’ background investigations are completed well before the 90 day mark, and attendance at the hiring event will make the process even faster. Pay - The salary and benefits package offered by GCPD is competitive with other large police agencies in Georgia. After an applicant receives a final job offer, they can begin work immediately for full pay. When an applicant accepts a final job offer, they become a police recruit. GCPD runs three or four police academies each year, but recruits will receive a non-enforcement assignment within the department until the next academy begins. Communications officers will immediately begin training in the 911 Call Center. Opportunity - Upon graduation from the academy, police recruits are sworn in as police officers.  Two years from an officer’s date of hire, they are eligible for assignment to a special unit. GCPD is a large, full service department, and has a wide range of assignments, including K9, SWAT, Criminal Investigations (detectives), Hazardous Devices Unit, Motorcycle Unit, DUI Unit, Accident Investigation Unit, Aviation, and Narcotics. Please visit www.gwinnettpolicejobs.com for more information and to apply.   More...
  2. Gwinnett celebrates official opening of its third project in seven daysThu, 20 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT
    Gwinnett County officials and history buffs celebrated the opening of the historic Isaac Adair House at the third ribbon cutting for a SPLOST-funded project in a week. The Isaac Adair House, located next to the Female Seminary in Lawrenceville, has benefitted from $1.055 million in improvements, including ADA accessibility to both structures, a restroom building, storage for programming supplies, landscaping and bus parking. The renovations to the site will create better access to the buildings and promote greater use for school field trips, community meetings and events. “Having these two restored, historic buildings together on one improved site is yet another SPLOST-funded amenity that makes Gwinnett County such a great place to live,” said Board of Commissioners Chairman Charlotte Nash said. She recounted the history of the 190-year-old building, one of Gwinnett’s oldest. Isaac Adair, a farmer and a surveyor, settled in Gwinnett in 1824 and lived in the area for 20 years before moving to Texas during the Civil War. He died on his way back to Gwinnett in 1866. His house had half a dozen other owners, most notably Marvin and Phyllis Hughes, who painstakingly restored it and had it listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The County acquired the historic structure and relocated it out of the path of the planned Sugarloaf Parkway extension in 2008 to its current location. She said the Female Seminary opened in 1838 at a time when most colleges did not admit women. It burned in the early 1850s, was rebuilt, and in 1888 was converted to a meeting house. District 2 Commissioner Lynette Howard said the site will continue the tradition of educating young people. “Having been an educator, I know the demand for opportunities to enhance education related to science, technology, engineering, art and math,” Howard said. “This site provides a unique opportunity to teach history and incorporate the creative engineering and technology concepts of the 1800s embedded in the original construction of these buildings. The living history programs implemented at this site will help preserve the lifestyle of frontier Gwinnett and bring history to life for our students.” District Commissioner 4 John Heard, an architect, said the Isaac Adair House and the Female Seminary signified a transition in the history of Gwinnett County. “The architecture and the grandeur of those two buildings illustrate a moment in our County’s history when the citizens felt their young community had changed from a rough, frontier outpost to something a little more settled and refined,” Heard said. “Projects like these remind us how fortunate we are to live in a community that appreciates and celebrates its past. They also reflect our commitment to constantly improving our quality of life, which makes Gwinnett County a great place to live and do business.” The Isaac Adair House celebration was the third event in the past week to recognize and officially open new recreational projects. On July 11, supporters of sports, playtime and recreation joined County officials for back-to-back ribbon cuttings to mark the completion of a new gymnasium at George Pierce Park and a playground and other improvements at McDaniel Farm Park. The new George Pierce Park gymnasium has a full-sized basketball court and elevated indoor track. The basketball court has two overlay courts for volleyball and badminton. The project was funded with $3.2 million in 2009 SPLOST revenue. District 1 Commissioner Jace Brooks said the new gym fills a need in the community. “The Suwanee area has an active and diverse population that will certainly take advantage of all that this new gym has to offer,” he said. The 134-acre McDaniel Farm Park received $3.4 million in upgrades for a new northeast entrance, an open play area, a picnic pavilion, a farm-themed playground, a dog park, trail extension, restrooms, landscaping and parking.   Photos from these events are available at www.flickr.com/photos/gwinnettcounty/albums.  To view video of the ribbon cutting at Isaac Adair House, click here. To view video of the ribbon cutting at McDaniel Farm Park, click here. To view video of the ribbon cutting at George Pierce Park, click here. For the Isaac Adair House By-the-Numbers flyer, click here. More...
  3. Commission sets millage rateTue, 18 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT
    The Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners adopted the 2017 millage rate in a 3-2 vote on Tuesday, July 18 as discussed at three recent public hearings on the proposal. The annual millage rate and individual annual property assessments determine each property owner’s property tax for County operations. Property tax bills also include school taxes, which are usually the larger portion of the total. For properties within certain cities, the tax bill may also include city taxes for those properties. The 2017 total County millage rate has been set at 13.51 mills, which reflects a modest increase of 0.334 mills from the 2016 total millage rate 13.176 mills.  The net increase results from an increase in the County M&O (General Fund) rate of 0.574 mills and a reduction of 0.24 mills in the millage for bond debt. One mill equals a thousand dollars of assessed value. The increase results in the owner of a $200,000 home paying about $21 more this year than in 2016.  This figure will vary from home to home, based on valuation changes and exemptions. In 2008, the value of one mill to County government was approximately $29.4 million. By 2013, it had dropped 20 percent to $23.6 million. In 2017, the value of a mill, approximately $28.9 million, has still not returned to its highest point prior to the economic downturn. “This millage rate allows us to balance the 2017 general fund budget and set aside funds to begin addressing long-standing hiring and retention issues, especially in law enforcement,” said Chairman Charlotte Nash, adding that mandated responsibilities in the judicial and law enforcement areas accounted for more than 85 percent of the general fund budget increase this year. Commissioners left millage rates unchanged for other funds including police, fire and emergency services, development and code enforcement, and recreation. “Over the last two or three years, we restored funding to critical functions we cut during the recession and provided needed additional funding for the justice system. We have to continue to focus on functions that are essential to keeping our County competitive and maintaining the quality of life that we all value,” said Nash. An interactive website feature lets property owners see the value they receive in county services along with an estimate of applicable county, schools, state and city taxes billed by the tax commissioner. A pie chart shows how the County allocates its portion. Look for Where Your Property Taxes Go under the Your Money button at www.gwinnettcounty.com. Today’s action allows the tax commissioner to mail property tax bills as scheduled in mid–August, with payment due in mid-October. Property owners or mortgage lenders can make payments by mail, online, by phone, at the main tax office in person or by using one of the special drop boxes located at tax and tag offices. More...
  4. Feline quarantine at Gwinnett animal shelter to be lifted; cat adoptions resume July 17Thu, 13 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT
    The Gwinnett County Animal Welfare and Enforcement Center is lifting a freeze on cat adoptions beginning Monday, July 17. And even better, the Catapalooza adoption special is still in effect through the end of July. The Animal Welfare staff imposed a quarantine on felines at the animal shelter in Lawrenceville on July 1 after a kitten died of suspected feline distemper (feline panleukopenia). A necropsy by the University of Georgia confirmed the disease. Symptoms of feline distemper are typically manifested within a two-week period. The quarantine is being lifted after no new cases appeared among the cats at the shelter. The state Department of Agriculture inspected the shelter and reviewed County Animal Welfare and Enforcement Division procedures and endorsed the County’s course of action. Animal Welfare is reaching out to rescue groups to take as many cats as possible because all of the feline pods will undergo deep cleaning July 16 to 18. The Animal Shelter intake office will again be accepting cats on Wednesday, July 19. The annual Catapalooza adoption event allows folks to adopt cats for only $10 through July 31. Adoption fees include the first round of vaccines, microchip and spay/neuter. Dog adoption fees are also reduced to just $30. For more information, visit www.gwinnettanimalwelfare.com or call 770-339-3200. Visit the shelter at 884 Winder Highway in Lawrenceville. More...
  5. County still in Level 2 drought response Fri, 23 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT
    Despite the recent rainfall, Gwinnett County remains in the Level 2 Drought Response that was declared in November. Lake Lanier is a large reservoir, fed by smaller streams that have been slow to recover from the drought. As a result, Lake Lanier has been slow to refill and is currently 10 feet below full pool. The drought response declared by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division put in place a number of outdoor watering restrictions for washing streets, sidewalks, and driveways; decorative uses, such as fountains and waterfalls; non-commercial pressure washing; fundraising car washes; and non-commercial washing of vehicles. For planting, growing, managing, or maintaining groundcover, trees, or shrubs, watering with an irrigation or sprinkler system is allowed on the following schedule: Even-numbered addresses (those ending in 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8) and sites with no numbered address may only water on Wednesdays and Saturdays before 10:00am and after 4:00pm. Odd-numbered addresses (those ending in 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9) may only water on Thursdays and Sundays before 10:00am and after 4:00pm. Water Resources encourages residents to make water conservation a priority. Individual actions can collectively add up to big water savings. Ways to save water include: Check and repair leaks inside and outside the home. Shorten showers and turn off water when shaving or brushing teeth. Fill dishwashers and washing machines, making sure there is a full load every time. Replace older toilets and shower heads with high0efficiency models. If your home was built before 1993, you may qualify for a toilet rebate. Choose efficient appliances. Look for EPA WaterSense and ENERGY STAR labeled products when shopping for new appliances and fixtures. Water Resources also provides leak detection and low-flow home retrofit kits to help residents conserve water. Both kits are available at the Customer Care counter located at 684 Winder Highway in Lawrenceville during normal business hours. For more information, including conservation tips and frequently asked questions about watering restrictions, visit www.gwinnettH2O.com. More...
  6. Outdoor burn ban in effect from May 1 through September 30Wed, 21 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT
    The Gwinnett County Department of Fire and Emergency Services would like remind citizens that a ban on outdoor/open burning is in place annually from May 1 through September 30. In accordance with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources ban on open burning, 54 counties in Georgia (including Gwinnett) are responsible for complying with the state-issued burn ban. The Georgia Environmental Protection Division imposes an annual ban on outdoor burning to comply with Federal Clean Air Regulations. During the summer months in Georgia, the ozone in the air we breathe can reach unhealthy levels. The EPD has identified outdoor/open burning as a significant contributor of the pollutants that form ozone. Consequently, open burning in metro Atlanta and larger counties is restricted during the warm weather season. The safe and cautious use of residential grills for outdoor cooking is still allowed and does not require a permit. The use of grills on balconies of apartment buildings is totally prohibited under the Gwinnett County Fire Ordinance. The following types of outdoor/open burning are banned: You may not burn trees, limbs, or any other yard waste. This includes a ban on the use of air curtain destructors for land clearing. The following types of outdoor/open burning are still allowed, provided the proper permits are obtained: Fires for agricultural practices zoned RA-200/residential agricultural or a forestry service prescribed burn. Fires for the purpose of training of firefighting personnel. Permits are required for all Bonfires for activities sponsored by educational, civic, religious, or other groups for the purpose of celebration. For information on permits, click here or call 678.518.6000. For additional information, please contact the Gwinnett Fire Community Risk Reduction Division/Fire Marshal’s Office at 678.518.4980 or go to the website at www.gwinnettfiremarshal.com. More...
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Gwinnett County Press News
  1. GWINNETT LIBRARY TO ANCHOR NEW SNELLVILLE CITY MARKETFri, 21 Jul 2017 19:34:07 EDT
    (Lawrenceville, Ga., July 18, 2017) – Gwinnett Chairman Charlotte Nash and Snellville Mayor Tom Witts signed an intergovernmental agreement Tuesday to work together on the design of a new branch library and city market building as part of the city’s Towne Center project. The signing ceremony followed adoption of the agreement by the Board of Commissioners. Nash said, “I’m excited about this joint venture with the city. The SPLOST-funded library will occupy about one-third of the space in the proposed three-story building and will be located on the first floor. The County will pay a third of the design cost for the building plus our share of an adjoining parking deck.” The new and larger Towne Center facility on Wisteria Drive will replace the existing branch library building at 2740 Lenora Church Road. The new library building will continue to be known as the Elizabeth H. Williams library. Snellville leaders said the city market could include restaurants, retail shops and other public, civic or educational facilities. “With the help of Gwinnett County, the new City Market and Library will be a centerpiece of our ambitious plan to create a new downtown Snellville, one that will spur commercial and residential growth and be a catalyst for development in the city for decades to come,” said Witts. “We are grateful for the help of our county leaders, moving us closer toward our goal of making Snellville a better place.” “This will be a great addition to the southern end of the county,” said District 3 Commissioner Tommy Hunter. “I’m glad we’ve been able to work together to make it happen, and this agreement is a testament to the willingness of the County and cities to work together to improve the lives of our residents.” The city also agreed to provide and maintain stormwater detention facilities for the area. Following finalization of space requirements by both parties, the County and city will hire a firm to design a mutually satisfactory building that meets minimum LEED sustainability standards. The County recently worked with the city of Lilburn on a shared library and city hall building that opened last October. More...
  2. TWO DOT SPLOST PROJECTS OPEN TO TRAFFICThu, 20 Jul 2017 09:21:33 EDT
    (Lawrenceville, Ga., July 20, 2017) – If it seems traffic is flowing just a little more smoothly in western Gwinnett, it’s not your imagination. With the recent opening of two SPLOST projects, smoother and safer traffic is the goal. Earlier this month, the Department of Transportation opened a new southbound access lane from Peachtree Parkway onto Peachtree Industrial Boulevard and last month the DOT activated a new traffic signal at the intersection of Tech Drive and Singleton Road. District 2 Commissioner Lynette Howard said, “These projects show how local and state governments work individually and together to focus on safety needs.” Working in conjunction with the Georgia Department of Transportation and the city of Peachtree Corners, Gwinnett extended a southbound lane on Peachtree Parkway, south of Holcomb Bridge Road, through the merge with Peachtree Industrial Boulevard. The new lane continues past the existing bridge over Jimmy Carter Boulevard before tapering down near the next southbound on-ramp. Drainage improvements and new overhead signage were also part of this project. The total estimated construction costs of $2.1 million are funded by the Georgia DOT at 62 percent, with the County and city of Peachtree Corners paying the remainder through a joint funding agreement using 2014 SPLOST funds. The traffic signal at Tech Drive and Singleton Road is a safety and alignment project from the 2014 SPLOST. The County added pedestrian crossings in conjunction with the new signal. Drainage improvements, handicap-accessible ramps and new sidewalks were also constructed as part of the project. For additional information about these and other SPLOST projects, visit www.gwinnettcounty.com.  More...
  3. GWINNETT CELEBRATES OFFICIAL OPENING OF ITS THIRD PROJECT IN SEVEN DAYSThu, 20 Jul 2017 09:20:49 EDT
    (Lawrenceville, Ga., July 20, 2017) – Gwinnett County officials and history buffs celebrated the opening of the historic Isaac Adair House at the third ribbon cutting for a SPLOST-funded project in a week. The Isaac Adair House, located next to the Female Seminary in Lawrenceville, has benefitted from $1.055 million in improvements, including ADA accessibility to both structures, a restroom building, storage for programming supplies, landscaping and bus parking. The renovations to the site will create better access to the buildings and promote greater use for school field trips, community meetings and events. “Having these two restored, historic buildings together on one improved site is yet another SPLOST-funded amenity that makes Gwinnett County such a great place to live,” said Board of Commissioners Chairman Charlotte Nash said. She recounted the history of the 190-year-old building, one of Gwinnett’s oldest. Isaac Adair, a farmer and a surveyor, settled in Gwinnett in 1824 and lived in the area for 20 years before moving to Texas during the Civil War. He died on his way back to Gwinnett in 1866. His house had half a dozen other owners, most notably Marvin and Phyllis Hughes, who painstakingly restored it and had it listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The County acquired the historic structure and relocated it out of the path of the planned Sugarloaf Parkway extension in 2008 to its current location. She said the Female Seminary opened in 1838 at a time when most colleges did not admit women. It burned in the early 1850s, was rebuilt, and in 1888 was converted to a meeting house. District 2 Commissioner Lynette Howard said the site will continue the tradition of educating young people. “Having been an educator, I know the demand for opportunities to enhance education related to science, technology, engineering, art and math,” Howard said. “This site provides a unique opportunity to teach history and incorporate the creative engineering and technology concepts of the 1800s embedded in the original construction of these buildings. The living history programs implemented at this site will help preserve the lifestyle of frontier Gwinnett and bring history to life for our students.” District Commissioner 4 John Heard, an architect, said the Isaac Adair House and the Female Seminary signified a transition in the history of Gwinnett County. “The architecture and the grandeur of those two buildings illustrate a moment in our County’s history when the citizens felt their young community had changed from a rough, frontier outpost to something a little more settled and refined,” Heard said. “Projects like these remind us how fortunate we are to live in a community that appreciates and celebrates its past. They also reflect our commitment to constantly improving our quality of life, which makes Gwinnett County a great place to live and do business.” The Isaac Adair House celebration was the third event in the past week to recognize and officially open new recreational projects. On July 11, supporters of sports, playtime and recreation joined County officials for back-to-back ribbon cuttings to mark the completion of a new gymnasium at George Pierce Park and a playground and other improvements at McDaniel Farm Park. The new George Pierce Park gymnasium has a full-sized basketball court and elevated indoor track. The basketball court has two overlay courts for volleyball and badminton. The project was funded with $3.2 million in 2009 SPLOST revenue. District 1 Commissioner Jace Brooks said the new gym fills a need in the community. “The Suwanee area has an active and diverse population that will certainly take advantage of all that this new gym has to offer,” he said. The 134-acre McDaniel Farm Park received $3.4 million in upgrades for a new northeast entrance, an open play area, a picnic pavilion, a farm-themed playground, a dog park, trail extension, restrooms, landscaping and parking. More...
  4. COMMISSION SETS MILLAGE RATEWed, 19 Jul 2017 11:51:41 EDT
    (Lawrenceville, Ga., July 18, 2017) – The Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners adopted the 2017 millage rate in a 3-2 vote Tuesday as discussed at three recent public hearings on the proposal. The annual millage rate and individual annual property assessments determine each property owner’s property tax for County operations. Property tax bills also include school taxes, which are usually the larger portion of the total. For properties within certain cities, the tax bill may also include city taxes for those properties. The 2017 total County millage rate has been set at 13.51 mills, which reflects a modest increase of 0.334 mills from the 2016 total millage rate 13.176 mills.  The net increase results from an increase in the County M&O (General Fund) rate of 0.574 mills and a reduction of 0.24 mills in the millage for bond debt. One mill equals a thousand dollars of assessed value. The increase results in the owner of a $200,000 home paying about $21 more this year than in 2016.  This figure will vary from home to home, based on valuation changes and exemptions. In 2008, the value of one mill to County government was approximately $29.4 million. By 2013, it had dropped 20 percent to $23.6 million. In 2017, the value of a mill, approximately $28.9 million, has still not returned to its highest point prior to the economic downturn. “This millage rate allows us to balance the 2017 general fund budget and set aside funds to begin addressing long-standing hiring and retention issues, especially in law enforcement,” said Chairman Charlotte Nash, adding that mandated responsibilities in the judicial and law enforcement areas accounted for more than 85 percent of the general fund budget increase this year. Commissioners left millage rates unchanged for other funds including police, fire and emergency services, development and code enforcement, and recreation. “Over the last two or three years, we restored funding to critical functions we cut during the recession and provided needed additional funding for the justice system. We have to continue to focus on functions that are essential to keeping our County competitive and maintaining the quality of life that we all value,” said Nash. An interactive website feature lets property owners see the value they receive in county services along with an estimate of applicable county, schools, state and city taxes billed by the tax commissioner. A pie chart shows how the County allocates its portion. Look for Where Your Property Taxes Go under the Your Money buttonat www.gwinnettcounty.com. Today’s action allows the tax commissioner to mail property tax bills as scheduled in mid–August, with payment due in mid-October. Property owners or mortgage lenders can make payments by mail, online, by phone, at the main tax office in person or by using one of the special drop boxes located at tax and tag offices. More...
  5. COUNTY OFFICIALS CELEBRATE IMPROVEMENTS TO TWO HISTORIC BUILDINGSMon, 17 Jul 2017 16:53:09 EDT
    WHAT:  Gwinnett County officials will celebrate the improvements at the Lawrenceville Female Seminary and the historic Isaac Adair House with a ribbon cutting and open house at the shared site. About $1.055 million from the 2009 SPLOST program were used to provide ADA accessibility to both structures, a courtyard, fountain, restroom building, storage for programming supplies, landscaping, bus parking, and other site improvements. The renovations to the site will create better access to the buildings and promote greater use for school field trips, community meetings and events. WHEN:  Tuesday, July 18 at 4:30 p.m. WHO:  Gwinnett County Recreation Authority Chairman Dr. Steve Flynt will emcee the event. Board of Commissioners Chairman Charlotte Nash, District 2 Commissioner Lynette Howard, and District 4 Commissioner John Heard will give remarks. City of Lawrenceville Mayor Judy Jordan Johnson will also attend and provide remarks. WHERE:  455 South Perry Street, Lawrenceville Ga., 30046 More...
  6. FELINE QUARANTINE AT GWINNETT ANIMAL SHELTER TO BE LIFTED; CAT ADOPTIONS RESUME JULY 17Fri, 14 Jul 2017 08:23:22 EDT
    (Lawrenceville, Ga., July 14, 2017) – The Gwinnett County Animal Welfare and Enforcement Center is lifting a freeze on cat adoptions beginning Monday, July 17. And even better, the Catapalooza adoption special is still in effect through the end of July. The Animal Welfare staff imposed a quarantine on felines at the animal shelter on July 1 after a kitten died of suspected feline distemper (feline panleukopenia). A necropsy by the University of Georgia confirmed the disease. Symptoms of feline distemper are typically manifested within a two-week period. The quarantine is being lifted after no new cases appeared among the cats at the shelter. The state Department of Agriculture inspected the shelter and reviewed County Animal Welfare and Enforcement Division procedures and endorsed the County’s course of action. Animal Welfare is reaching out to rescue groups to take as many cats as possible because all of the feline pods will undergo deep cleaning July 16 to 18. The Animal Shelter intake office will again be accepting cats on Wednesday, July 19. The annual Catapalooza adoption event allows folks to adopt cats for only $10 through July 31. Adoption fees include the first round of vaccines, microchip and spay/neuter. Dog adoption fees are also reduced to just $30. For more information, visit www.gwinnettanimalwelfare.com or call 770-339-3200. Visit the shelter at 884 Winder Highway in Lawrenceville. More...