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  1. Marker could signal feline renal disease months to years earlier, study finds21 Nov 2014 12:43:39 CST
    A newly identified biomarker known as SDMA can be used to identify kidney disease in cats an average of 17 months earlier tha -More-  More...
  2. Chagas disease remains under U.S. physician radar21 Nov 2014 12:43:39 CST
    In general, U.S.  -More-  More...
  3. Scientist who discovered Lyme bacteria dies21 Nov 2014 12:43:39 CST
    Wilhelm Burgdorfer, the Swiss-born scientist who discovered the Lyme disease spirochete, died at the age of 89 in Montana.  -More-  More...
  4. Tapeworm larva migrating through man's brain caused chronic headaches21 Nov 2014 12:43:39 CST
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  5. Creators of tomorrow's technology get inspiration from birds, bats and fish21 Nov 2014 12:43:39 CST
     -More- Hundreds of Jobs, Qualified Candidates The AVMA Veterinary Career Center (VCC) has the candidates and jobs you need to Find the Right Fit for your veterinary, veterinary technician, veterinary hospital manager and other team position needs. Come to www.avma.org/vcc to get started. More...
Dog Amazingly Leads a Lost Cop to a House fire
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For The Love Of Dogs
  1. London Council Has a Plan for Dog Poop: Paint It PinkFri, 21 Nov 2014 11:20:00 -0800
    Communities are always trying new things to address the problem of dog owners who refuse to clean up after their pets. Some of the more extreme reactions include the cities of Ipswich, Massachussetts, and Boulder, Colorado, who actually considered going all CSI and creating DNA databases of the local dogs. The borough council of Camden in London has chosen a more low-tech, but more colorful, approach: They're going to paint the poop pink. According to Sally Gimson, Camden's council member for the environment, the idea is to embarrass those who don't clean up their dog poop by letting them know that their neighbors are watching. "It's about embarrassing the people who aren't picking up the poo after their dogs," she told the Evening Standard. "The whole point is really to embarrass dog owners who are doing it to say, 'we have noticed you've done it, and you shouldn't be doing it'." Share this image Would people be more likely to pick this up if it were painted pink? Dog Poop by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) That's all well and good, but in the end all the Council is doing is publicizing the fact that there's a problem with poop in the neighborhood. They're not actually going to clean up the poop, just hand out cans of paint to the local residents and let them spray away. Ultimately, there will still be poop, but now it will be... pink. Strangely, this isn't a unique or new solution. It's been tried in several towns and apartment complexes in Europe. Earlier this year, the St. Michel apartments in Arras, France, started handing out paint cans to their security guards. In 2012, the council in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, implemented a similar plan. In 2010, it was also tried by the council in Staffordshire and a volunteer group in Warminster. Share this image Dog by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) There's no word on how successful any of these pink poo campaigns have been. However, they all have one thing in common: Whether or not the culprits are actually embarrassed by seeing their dog's feces painted a bright, fluorescent pink, everyone else in the community still has to see piles of excrement lying around. If anything, pink poo looks prettier than the usual brown variety. In the United States, this would be a hipster art project making some kind of nebulous statement about materialistic capitalism. What do you think? Does painting poo pink help solve the problem, or does it just make it cuter? Via London Evening Standard Read more about dogs in the news on Dogster: A Golden Retriever Fails an Obedience Contest in a Glorious Way Watch This Pit Bull Face His Fears Butt First A Texas Shelter Spayed a Woman's Dog Without Her Permission More...
  2. Vid We Love: Watch This Little Yorkie Terrify a Big, Bad Burglar Fri, 21 Nov 2014 10:20:00 -0800
    It's common thinking that big dogs make the best guard dogs, a fact that burns little dogs to no end. You see them staring at big dogs, sizing them up, looking for weaknesses, thinking, "You ain't all that, Bluto. My teeth are daggers. My bark is fierce." Little dogs know that the most important thing in being a good guard dog is not size but ferocity, a quality little dogs hone to perfection.  Share this image A man up to no good. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Take the little dog in this video, a Yorkie named Scamp. Never have we seen a more effective guard dog. Look how Criminal comes swaying into the backyard, lumbering like he has just eaten at Outback Steakhouse and is looking for a bed to steal. Scamp remains off-screen -- he's probably in the house, watching the intruder, outlining his plan. "I'm going to flip," he thinks. "Criminal won't know what hit him. My bark will be heard in Johannesburg!"  Forgot to say: This video comes from South Africa.  In any case, Criminal does try to make it into the house, Scamp does flip, and Criminal flees like he's in a Looney Tunes cartoon. He almost runs in mid-air and scales not one but two fences in his panicked escape. This dog nailed his duties, and he is one proud Yorkie. Watch: Don't you love the way Scamp turns a little 360 at the end?  The video was first posted on Reddit, where it went nuts, and then on YouTube, where it swept past 500,000 views after just two days. One commenter says the man was arrested later while committing another burglary and told police he has cynophobia -- fear of dogs. Fear of Scamp, more like. Share this image Do you feel lucky, punk? Photo via Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Read more about dogs in the news on Dogster: Uber Driver Leaves Blind Woman With Service Dog Stranded A Golden Retriever Fails an Obedience Contest in a Glorious Way Watch This Pit Bull Face His Fears Butt First More...
  3. Uber Driver Leaves Blind Woman With Service Dog StrandedThu, 20 Nov 2014 11:40:00 -0800
    A few months ago, we told you how the California chapter of the National Federation of the Blind was suing ride-sharing service Uber for discriminating against passengers with service dogs. The suit cited a number of incidences. In one, California UberX driver put a blind woman's service dog in the trunk without her knowledge. In another, a driver sped off after slowing to pick up a man and his service dog, shouting "No dogs!" All told, the National Federation of the Blind said it knew of more than 30 instances where blind passengers were denied service. Now, we have another. A blind woman told NBC New York that a Uber driver refused to pick her up, leaving her and her service dog Elvis stranded on the street. It happened on Tuesday night in Darien, Connecticut, when Amy Dixon called the service for a ride.   Share this image Amy Dixon function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) "I can see a little bit out of my right eye; I've got one percent left of my vision. So I'm standing there with my guide dog on the curb, and a car pulls up, and it's him," she told NBC New York.  But when the driver saw her dog, he sped off. Dixon said her hand was on the handle when the driver bolted.  "I couldn't believe it. I was flabbergasted," she said. "He took off, and I'm screaming at him, waving at him, waving my arms like crazy thinking maybe he made a mistake because I was hoping it wasn't what I thought it was."  Then, 10 seconds later, she received a message saying her ride was cancelled.  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Dixon said she has relied on taxis and, more recently, Uber since losing her vision seven years ago.   "My dog is how I get from point A to point B, and a car is what enables us to get where we need to go," she said. To its credit, Uber fired the driver. The company said in a statement: "The Uber app is built to expand access to transportation options for all, including users with visual impairments and other disabilities. It is Uber's policy that any driver partner that refuses to transport a service animal will be deactivated from the Uber platform, which has been done in this case." It's a good policy. Are all of the company's drivers aware of it?   Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Dixon wasn't stranded for long -- she got right back on Uber and another driver picked her up with no issues. Still, it burns her.  "It breaks my heart that people aren't educated on the ADA law," she told NBC New York. Via NBC New York  Read more about dogs in the news on Dogster: A Chihuahua Was Mayor of San Francisco on Tuesday! A Texas Shelter Spayed a Woman's Dog Without Her Permission Dog Hitches Ride on Side of Ambulance Carrying His Ailing Owner More...
  4. A Golden Retriever Fails an Obedience Contest in a Glorious WayThu, 20 Nov 2014 11:25:00 -0800
    Sometimes it's just not worth acting like you're supposed to. Life just puts a whole bunch of treats in front of you, there for the taking, and it's a lot more rewarding to grab them in a mad frenzy than it is to obey the rules. I'm not being metaphorical here. This is exactly what happened at a dog obedience contest in Finland. The object was that each dog was supposed to sit at one end of a strip, then run directly to their trainer, completely ignoring the tempting meat snacks and toys lined up along the sides. In the video below, you can see the first two dogs execute the course perfectly: They come when called, acting as if there weren't tasty sausages and squeak toys sitting mere inches away. Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) The third dog, a beautiful Golden Retriever, had a completely different philosophy toward the contest. It starts out well: He approaches the starting line and sits with calm dignity, but then when his trainer calls him, well... there are all those treats. They're just sitting there. And he decides to go for them. Share this image The dog's young owner watches in horror as he has a great time. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) The best thing about this video is how the dog goes for all the treats with such unashamed abandon. He can't even really decide which one he wants. He just tries to grab everything within reach: first a stuffed toy, then some sausage, then back to another toy. The Huffington Post's writeup of the video describes it as a "delightful rampage," and it's really hard to come up with two words that describe it better. I know that the dog's owner is probably mortified right now, but in a way, this dog is my hero today. Sometimes you just have to go for the treats, especially when someone's already lined them up in neat rows for you. Via YouTube Read more news by Chris Hall: Watch This Pit Bull Face His Fears Butt First A Texas Shelter Spayed a Woman's Dog Without Her Permission Dogs Playing D&D: a New Twist On an Old Classic More...
  5. Watch This Pit Bull Face His Fears Butt FirstWed, 19 Nov 2014 11:15:00 -0800
    A lot of people are still scared of Pit Bulls. Despite the efforts of their human admirers to debunk myths and half-truths about the breed, "pit bull" is still common shorthand for a dog that's vicious, mean, and violent. The next time you want to show someone that Pit Bulls can be just as vulnerable and loving as any other dog, share this video of Rhiannon Hamam's dog, Queso. According to Hamam, Queso is scared of just about everything: the kitchen floor, the printer, and doorways. Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) That's a lot of things to be scared of, especially the last. Doorways are everywhere. It's almost like they're some kind of sinister alien race that's infiltrated every single household, business, theater, and house of worship in the world. We don't know how Queso deals with his fear of the kitchen floor or printers, but he has come up with a charming way of dealing with the fear of doors. He turns around and goes through butt first, in a canine equivalent of Michael Jackson's "moonwalk." Share this image Queso's housemate Denver, who is apparently NOT afraid to go through doors. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) It's interesting to speculate on what could have caused such a fear. To my knowledge, there's no equivalent phobia in humans. The closest I can think of is the anxiety some people feel when they're all alone and there's a closed door leading to a closet or a basement. If you stare long enough, you can imagine anything behind that door, especially if you've watched enough horror movies. There's also agoraphobia, which is a fear of open spaces that can be so disabling that those who suffer from it become trapped in their own homes, but even that is a fear of what's beyond the door, rather than the act of walking through it. Share this image Queso prepares for a butt-first entry. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) On Reddit, Hamam went into more detail about Queso and his fear of doors. It seems that some doors are scarier than others: Queso is a rescue, but we got him when he was about 10 weeks old. So we don't think there was anything too traumatic about going through a doorway that could've messed him up this badly, although that's a possibility. He will go through the front and back doors of the house (to go outside or to come in), and moves around the downstairs (where there's more of an open floor plan--no literal doorways to go through) freely. Upstairs, our bedroom is the only doorway he'll go through. He flat refuses to enter other rooms. We think he forces himself to enter our bedroom because we spend a lot of time there and he wants to join the party--the other rooms are only temporarily occupied so he just lets the fear dominate haha. We don't use invisible fences or any type of shock/vibrating collar. He's just a total weirdo. In some ways, it's a very human reaction. Sometimes people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder are triggered by things that seem very mundane to others. The stereotypical triggers are things like graphic depictions of violence and loud noises, but they can just as often be things like the smell of a certain kind of fabric or soap. We'll probably never know if Queso suffered from some kind of trauma at a puppy mill or something, but it looks like he's found his own ways of living happily with his human family. Via YouTube and Reddit Read more news at Dogster: A Texas Shelter Spayed a Woman's Dog Without Her Permission Dogs Playing D&D: a New Twist On an Old Classic Did PETA Abduct and Kill a Virginia Family's Dog? More...
  6. A Chihuahua Was Mayor of San Francisco Yesterday! Wed, 19 Nov 2014 10:15:00 -0800
    A dog was mayor of San Francisco yesterday, and as of 9 a.m., the streets were running with kibble. The shelter cages had been thrown open, traffic had stopped, and businesspeople sat cross-legged on the street in the financial district, patting good boys. Restaurants grilled everything they had and flung it out their doors, Frisbees crisscrossed the sky like missiles, and the cats ... well, nobody had seen a cat since the stroke of midnight.  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) While technically very little of that is true, a dog really was mayor of the city yesterday. Her name is Frida. She is a good dog. Let's let her owner, Dean Clark, take over the descriptive duties: "She's a Chihuahua mix, a rescue dog, who weighs -- she's near me and might bite me if I give you the wrong number -- I'm going to say about six pounds," the retired schoolteacher from South San Francisco told Citylab. "She's a very fair-tempered, wonderful dog." Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) And she was mayor for 24 glorious hours, thanks to Clark, who bid for the honor this fall at an auction sponsored by the nonprofit San Francisco Animal Care and Control. How much can you buy a mayorship for? "All I can say is it was a healthy donation, not just a couple of dollars," said Clark. Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) In addition to her official duties -- wagging her tail, eating, having a nap or two throughout the day -- Frida hung out with the Board of Supervisors and held a press conference at City Hall.  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) As for Frida's bona fides, it seems like she's been running for office for years. She's the For the Love of Dog USA mascot, and every year the rescue pup participates in the city's Saint Patrick's Day Parade with the adopt-a-rescue contingent. She also participates in the monthly meeting of the San Francisco Chihuahua Meetup Group at Stern Grove Dog Park. Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Clark said that he hopes her day in office brings more attention to the issue of "canine abandonment," he told Citylab, "which just makes my heart drop." Via Citylab; all photos via the For the Love of Dog Facebook page Read recent stories about dogs in the news:  A Texas Shelter Spayed a Woman's Dog Without Her Permission How to Take Great Pictures of Your Dog -- in 1956 Dog Hitches Ride on Side of Ambulance Carrying His Ailing Owner   More...
  7. A Texas Shelter Spayed a Woman's Dog Without Her Permission Tue, 18 Nov 2014 10:15:00 -0800
    Generally speaking, spaying and neutering your dogs is a good thing. Far too few people do it, and that means a lot of dogs end up in shelters, with many being eventually euthanized, or living as strays. But for whatever reason, Texas dog owner Taylor Sells didn't want her dogs spayed, and she's furious that the City of Irving's Animal Services did so with one. Share this image Taylor Sells, owner of Charlie and Whiskey. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Over a week ago, her dogs Whiskey and Charlie made a break for it by digging under the fence of the family's new home. The family themselves were in Denton, about 35 miles away, getting stuff from their old house. Two days after the dogs escaped, Sells found their pictures on the Irving Animal Services website, available for adoption. Charlie was pregnant, and the shelter was desperately trying to find a home for the dog and her imminent litter. Apparently the only communication between Sells and the shelter happened by way of a series of voicemails. On Saturday, after finding her dogs on the website, Sells called the shelter and left a voicemail. She told the Dallas-Ft. Worth CBS affiliate, "I figured if you call about a dog who is pregnant, [and] they're desperately trying to find them a rescue online, and you call and say both these dogs are mine, they should be relieved and say, 'okay pick them up.'" The pickup didn't happen until later in the week. By that time, Charlie had given birth, and Whiskey's ovaries had been removed. Share this image Animal Services Manager Corey Price. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) According to animal services manager Corey Price, the shelter faces constant overcrowding like many others in the United States. To help deal with that, a city ordinance requires that animals be prepared for adoption after 72 hours in the system. That includes spaying or neutering them. "The shelter is always receiving animals," Price told CBS. "We're always at or near capacity. So, it is an urgent thing to keep moving animals towards adoption, to prevent euthanasia." Share this image The inside of the Irving shelter. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) According to Price, things would have been different if the dogs had either collar tags or microchips. When there's identification, animals are held for up to 10 days while the shelter tries to contact the owner. Whiskey and Charlie had none, so Whiskey was spayed on Tuesday morning. (The shelter is closed on Sunday and Monday.) While the details of the incident don't seem ideal, I have to ask if Sells' grief and outrage at the shelter is really justified. Of all the tragedies that we've reported here at Dogster, having your pet spayed without your consent must surely rank at the low end. It's certainly not as bad as PETA kidnapping your dog and killing her. Charlie gave birth to 10 puppies before she was brought home, which must be enough for any dog lover to deal with. Instead, that seems only to turn Sells' anger at the shelter up a notch, and she projects those feelings onto Whiskey: "You can just see it now in her face," Sells told CBS. "She's depressed. She sees Charlie with her puppies and knows she can't have them." Share this image Charlie's new litter of puppies: Cute, but will they find homes? function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) I can virtually guarantee that this isn't true. Whiskey may feel a little sore, but she almost certainly doesn't know that she can't have puppies any more. Puppies are cute, but we need less of them. The reason that Price must deal with constant overcrowding is that everyone thinks that puppies are cute, but not everyone is willing to deal with raising and caring for an adult dog. In an ideal world, there would have been better communication between Sells and the shelter, and no surgery would have been performed without her permission. But in that same ideal world, both dogs would have had tags and microchips, and probably would have already been spayed. What do you think? Is this the tragic mishap that Sells is presenting in the media, or a reasonable misunderstanding by an overworked agency? Via CBS Read more about dogs in the news: Did PETA Abduct and Kill a Virginia Family's Dog? Veterinary Association Releases Guidelines on Dogs and Ebola "Godfather" of Dog-Fighting Ring Sentenced to 8 Years in Prison  More...
  8. How to Take Great Pictures of Your Dog -- in 1956Tue, 18 Nov 2014 09:40:00 -0800
    With cameras now tucked into everyone's pockets, never in history have we had more opportunities to take pictures of our pets. At Dogster and Catster, we don't shy away from telling you how to do that: 8 Tips for Taking Pictures of Your Dogs With a Cell Phone Camera 10 Tips for Getting Great Photos of Your Dog The Basics of Dog Photography How to Photograph Your Dog: Mood-Altering Camera Angles  How to Avoid Taking Crappy Photos of Your Cat 6 Tips for Taking Great Pictures of Your Cat  10 Tips for Getting Great Photos of Your Cat 5 Tips for Taking Good Photos of Your Cat In 1956, things weren't that different: People were still telling you how to take pictures of your pet. Of course, the cameras weighed 55 pounds, required you to twist a crank to get them started, and could burn down the neighborhood if handled improperly. But still, people valued a quality photo of the family dog, a well-composed shot to place on the mantel to remind them of dear Fido, banned to the backyard for months at a time.   It was a different era.  The 1956 video below from Kodak on how to photograph your dog, however, shows the love. And some pretty good tips, which span the ages. We broke them down:   1. Distract the dog with a boy born in 1950 Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) He should be well-behaved, thanks to Pop putting the fear of God in him on a nightly basis.  2. Use a favorite ball or bone Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) But don't use your father's special ball signed by Sandy Koufax because there will be hell to pay. 3. Use a simple background Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Tip: Don't imply mom's flowered wallpaper is "simple," unless you want to eat a boiled shoe tonight.  4. Distract the dog with a basket of kittens Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) You'll find the kittens under your house, where that stray you've been ignoring for years is on her seventh litter.  5. Take many photos  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Three should be sufficient, but if you hit the numbers this week, live a little and take four.  6. Always use Kodak film Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Uh, about that ...  Watch the commercial: Once again:  8 Tips for Taking Pictures of Your Dogs With a Cell Phone Camera 10 Tips for Getting Great Photos of Your Dog The Basics of Dog Photography How to Avoid Taking Crappy Photos of Your Cat 6 Tips for Taking Great Pictures of Your Cat  10 Tips for Getting Great Photos of Your Cat 5 Tips for Taking Good Photos of Your Cat How to Photograph Your Dog: Mood-Altering Camera Angles More...
  9. Dog Hitches Ride on Side of Ambulance Carrying His Ailing OwnerMon, 17 Nov 2014 11:45:00 -0800
    When Texas rancher JR Nicholson felt dizzy last week, he told his ranch hand Brian Wright to call an ambulance, and soon enough the 85-year-old man was loaded into the back of one by Tanner Brown, an emergency medical technician. Things were happening as they should. Then about 20 miles into the one-hour drive to the hospital, a driver pulled alongside Brown and did the whole hand-waving Hey, you've got a dog on the side of your ambulance! rigamarole. Brown immediately pulled over, and sure enough there was a dog on the side of his ambulance: Buddy, a 35-pound Beagle mix, kin to the man laid out in the interior.  Share this image Photo via ABC 15's Twitter page. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) JR's dog, Buddy, wasn't about to let his master head off to the hospital without him, so he had hitched a ride on a small step on the side of the vehicle. The dog had been standing -- calmly, we suppose, because this is clearly one hell of a dog -- on the side of an ambulance barreling through Texas for 20 miles. Brown let instinct take over at that point. We didnt have anything else to do but to load the dog up and put him in the ambulance and take him to the ER with us, Brown told the Standard-Times.  Once Buddy was inside the ambulance, he went to work saving his owner. The dog noticed the EMTs weren't using the lights and sirens to full affect, and he went about changing that.  It was kind of funny. We were inside, and he had jumped onto the control switch and turned on the sirens and the lights, Brown said. We didnt know what was going on. Share this image Ambulance via Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Once they made it to the hospital and JR went off to be treated, ranch hand Wright showed up and was shocked to see the dog. He had locked up the ranch but hadn't seen Buddy; he figured the dog was roaming, as he often does on the property.  Two things go through your mind in a split second, Wright told the Standard-Times. First, what could have happened to [Buddy], and second, you realize he is quite an animal. On normal days, Buddy rides tractors, so riding an ambulance probably wasn't much of a stretch -- at least until it hit second gear.  As for JR, he was fine after a short visit and was released the same day, and the nurses even let Buddy visit him in his room. JR rescued Buddy from a shelter four months prior, and the dog has captured his heart.  I had two dogs (before Buddy), but I had to put one of them down, Nicholson said. He came along at just the right time. Hes now a member of the family. Via Standard-Times Read more about dogs in the news: Did PETA Abduct and Kill a Virginia Family's Dog? Veterinary Association Releases Guidelines on Dogs and Ebola "Godfather" of Dog-Fighting Ring Sentenced to 8 Years in Prison    More...
  10. Dogs Playing D&D: a New Twist On an Old ClassicMon, 17 Nov 2014 09:45:00 -0800
    Despite the predictions of fundamentalist tracts like Jack Chick's bizarrely classic Dark Dungeons, playing role-playing games as a teen did not result in hellish consequences for my soul. I did not commune with demons, make suicide pacts, mutilate small animals, engage in bizarre sex rituals, or any of the other dire things predicted by the moral guardians of the time. I actually was quite open to the idea of bizarre sex rituals, but the opportunity never presented itself, especially during gaming. We were much more likely to obsess over the color of our new dice or how best to talk the Game Master into letting us modify our initiative roll so we would survive an encounter with a bunch of surly looking orcs. Share this image What Jack Chick and other Christians thought was happening in D&D games. ("Dark Dungeons," 1984) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Anyone who shares that past (and when the opportunity arises, present) is probably going to appreciate the charm of Johannes Grenzfurthner and Heather Kelley's image of Dogs Playing Dungeons & Dragons. We all know the original: It's one of the images from C.M. Coolidge's series of 16 paintings called Dogs Playing Poker, created in 1903 as cigar advertisements. Grenzfurthner is specifically drawing from the picture called A Friend in Need, which shows one dog discreetly using his rear leg to pass some cards under the table. You don't usually get that kind of cheating in RPGs -- you're far more likely to get "rules lawyers," who will nitpick every decision of the GM because they've committed the entire Player's Manual to memory. Share this image "Dogs Playing Dungeons and Dragons," by Johannes Grenzfurthner and Heather Kelley. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) The clutter and atmosphere are really true to the gaming experience, and I'd never thought before about the similarities between poker and RPGs as social bonding experiences. Neither of the pictures really get across the mechanics of their respective games, but they are excellent depictions of the social dynamic of sitting in a room with a bunch of friends for hours on end just playing. If you've been there, you can spend a lot of time picking out familiar details. Share this image "A Friend in Need," the original 1903 painting by C.M. Coolidge. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Coolidge's original paintings became American icons because they were mass-marketed far beyond the original advertisements. I first saw A Friend in Need on a postcard when I was about 10 years old, and in the last 100 years, the images have been printed on just about anything that has a printable surface. It looks like Grenzfurthner and Kelly are taking the same route: You can get their update printed on clothing, phone cases, stickers, and tote bags at Red Bubble. Via Laughing Squid and Red Bubble Check out more cuteness on Dogster: Monday Miracle: Bunny The Dog Defies Cuteness Conventions Cute Video Alert: A Dog and a Disabled Cat Are Great Play Pals Charcoal the Lab Loves His Bucket More Than ANYTHING More...
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