About Ourtown Own A Town Sign In
Videos
Labradoodle mistaken for a lion
Doggie Style
Timeout while waiting for the requested data.
Pet News
  1. U.S. and Chinese researchers discover new tick-borne disease24 Apr 2015 14:09:31 CDT
    Researchers from the U.S.  -More-  More...
  2. View AVMA's One Health resources24 Apr 2015 14:09:31 CDT
     -More-  More...
  3. USDA considers poultry vaccine for influenza outbreak24 Apr 2015 14:09:31 CDT
    The USDA may initiate work on a vaccine for H5N2 avian influenza, the strain affecting farms across the Midwest.  -More-  More...
  4. CDC mulls human avian influenza vaccine amid poultry influenza outbreak24 Apr 2015 14:09:31 CDT
     -More-  More...
  5. Infectious disease expert takes the helm at K-State veterinary school24 Apr 2015 14:09:31 CDT
    Veterinarian Tammy Beckham has been named dean of the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and her new job -More-  More...
Dog Amazingly Leads a Lost Cop to a House fire
Advertisements
Dog Eating Peanut Butter
For The Love Of Dogs
  1. Hungarian Short Film Makes Powerful Statement About Abandoned Children and PetsFri, 24 Apr 2015 10:50:00 -0700
    The video below is very powerful, but also very intense. Just a warning: Brace yourself if you decide to watch it. Produced by Zoetis, a Hungarian company that sells medicines for livestock and pets, the film, "Gift," makes a statement both about abandoned children and abandoned pets. Without words, it tells the story of a family that adopts a redheaded girl and brings her into their home. As time goes on, she starts to seem less adorable and more ... bothersome. She gets in fights with the older daughter, bothers the father while he's working on the computer, and messes up one of the rooms while playing -- apparently from a combination of boredom, loneliness, and resentment. Share this image The "redheaded stepchild" after messing up the bedroom. Via YouTube function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) That's apparently the last straw for the family: The father takes her and her stuffed doll for a long drive and stops somewhere out in the countryside where there's no one around. They could conceivably be the only people around for miles. He throws the doll, and when she runs frantically to get it, he drives away. Share this image Via YouTube function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) In the last shot, it's not a redheaded little girl sitting on the road, watching the car drive away; it's a dog. The final captions say (in English) "Be Responsible. Give, adopt wisely." Share this image Via YouTube function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) That, of course, is the flip side of pet adoption. We strive to get across the message that people should adopt pets from shelters instead of buying them from pet stores or breeders, but in either case, it's important that they know what they're getting into. Having a dog or other animal is a huge responsibility, and it's not all beer and Skittles (or more appropriately, kibble and Frisbees). Sometimes it takes a lot of patience and time that you'd rather spend doing something else, just as with any other member of the family. The fact that a lot of people see only the cuteness and not the responsibility when they get a pet is why so many animals wind up back at the shelter or worse, stranded alone on the roadside. Share this image Via YouTube function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Director Zsofia Zsemberi shared her thoughts about the film at Bored Panda: We made this short movie in order to draw attention to the abandoned, abused animals on the planet. I truly think that it is just as important to understand that whatever happens to an animal could also happen to a child. It is also a known fact that someone who abuses animals is likely to abuse human beings as well. This is why we thought that this strong resemblance between child and dog is important in this movie. We cannot turn our heads away from brutality and abusement in the world, and it doesnt matter if its something thats happening next to you, in your neighborhood, or in a far away land. As a filmmaker and human/animal rights activist, I think its important to make movies that could influence others to rethink or even change things for the better in their own lives or in the way things are happening around them. There can't be any better reason for making a movie. It's a beautifully made film, but once again, be careful and brace yourself before watching it. It has a kick. Via YouTube Read more news about dogs on Dogster: Here's a Man With a Mission: To Name Dogs and Buy Kickstarter Dog Drives Tractor Onto Scotland Highway, Causing Chaos and Twitter Jokes Would You Treat Your Dog With Medical Marijuana Treats? More...
  2. Look at This Dog With a Square HeadThu, 23 Apr 2015 10:30:00 -0700
    At Dogster, we don't shy away from stories of extreme grooming, because that gives us a chance to show you this picture:  Share this image Via Paul Nathan's book, Groomed. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) That's a dog in there. Only one. And a little man.   But now a new trend has developed in Taiwan where people are foregoing the wild and the fanciful and the little man on the thigh for the pure, the refined, the elemental -- the geometric.  Would you just look at this dog:  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) That right there is a dog with a square head. And if you thought that was the only dog with a square head wandering around the country wondering how long it will take for a circumference to grow back, think again. This is another dog with a square head:  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) And another:  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Three dogs with square heads, courtesy of the Thai site Siam55. In searching for some explanation for these heads, we hit Google translate on this Siam55 and came face to face with the limitations of Google Translate. In any event, this is what these square heads are all about:  Now becoming extremely strong currents. When sharing a dog with fur hippest out in the social world. The dog grooming shop, this store is a store for a small breed of dog that starts in Taiwan Taipei.  The dog hair styling brackets. Shared eyes to the world of social media is that your opponents Ming Feng, by his given name was carrying the "Yuan" to do better than that, pretty much. So, not much to go on there -- unless you've gone all in for square heads and understand it perfectly. But before you pull out your ruler, understand that square heads are only half the battle in the war over geometric grooming. The other half is a circle -- the perfect circle.  Here: Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) So, squares and circles. The brave new world in extreme grooming -- which is best left, of course, to the professionals. Have you ever tried to draw a perfect circle? Imagine cutting one on your dog's face. It'll look like you had a stroke halfway through and decided to complete the job before collapsing. What do you think? Is geometric grooming the wave of the future or have you just had it with this stuff? Let us know in the comments. Via Rocket News 24  See more Pix We Love on Dogster: Paris Hilton's Dog Tinkerbell Dies at Age 14 50 Bulldogs Vie for Most Beautiful at Drake University SoCal Corgi Beach Day: 634 Corgis Invade Huntington Beach More...
  3. Here's a Man With a Mission: To Name Dogs and Buy KickstarterThu, 23 Apr 2015 10:20:00 -0700
    While Kickstarter and its crowdfunding cousins have helped launch a lot of interesting projects that might otherwise have languished in oblivion, they've also provided a platform for the weird and the wasteful. The most infamous example of the latter happened last September, when Ohio resident Zack Brown managed to raise $55,000 to make a potato salad. Brown's Kickstarter began as a joke, but the really weird ones aren't joking. Aaron Schlechter seems to be trying to raise the bar on absurd crowdfunding projects. Schlechter thinks that he has a gift for naming dogs. He also thinks that a lot of people are in desperate need of his gift, because they keep on giving their dogs lousy names. Share this image Apparently the social consequences of giving your dog the wrong name are dire indeed. (Via Kickstarter) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) So, he started a Kickstarter campaign that would allow him to promote his skill and name dogs for money. As he saw it, this was a great humanitarian venture. "Don't die alone just because you're terrible at naming dogs and people are constantly judging you because of it," his Kickstarter page says. "Let me name your dog." Unfortunately for Schlechter, it turns out that Kickstarter does have some standards about what you can do on their site, and it shut down his campaign. Not because the campaign was silly, but because it failed to meet the first qualification of Kickstarter's guidelines. At the end of your campaign, you have to actually create something: Projects must create something to share with others. Kickstarter can be used to create all sorts of things: art and gadgets, events and spaces, ideas and experiences. But every project needs a plan for creating something and sharing it with the world. At some point, the creator should be able to say: "It's finished. Here's what we created. Enjoy!" So, Schlechter had to tweak his campaign a little bit to focus on producing a book about naming dogs. In his original campaign, the book was just something that he might get around to someday if he had the time/inclination. Now, it's the primary goal. Share this image How Schlecter imagines the process working. (Via Kickstarter) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) But Schlechter has a new goal now, too. Thanks to Kickstarter's lack of appreciation for his dog-naming mission, he thinks that the whole company needs a change. His goal to produce the book is $3,700. But if he raises more than that -- if he can extend his fundraising to $1.2 billion, he wants to buy Kickstarter outright and make it into a dog-naming site. According to him, it should be easy: If I raise $1,200,000,000, however, I plan to buy Kickstarter and amend its rules so only projects related to the naming of dogs will be allowed on this site. That may seem like a stretch, but think about it--if only one out of every six people on earth donates $1 for me to name their dog "Donald" then we're in business. Well, only 1 in 6 people out of the entire planet. That should be a snap, then. Share this image (Via Kickstarter) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Of course, the question immediately comes to mind: If Schlechter is such a genius at naming dogs, why in the world is "Donald" his ideal choice for 1.2 billion dogs? Even considering that that's the cheapie option, it doesn't seem terribly original, especially when you consider the allegedly dire consequences of giving your dog the wrong name. According to Schlechter: If you name a dog the wrong name it's not just you that has to deal with the consequences. Your poor dog will have to too. Its feelings are going to be hurt terribly like a bee that stings a person that it thinks is a threat to the hive it lives in on and off, only to realize that that person was actually bringing all the bees Capri Sun and orange wedges and that the kind-hearted soul is now going to die of anaphylactic shock because they accidentally took a sharpie with them that morning instead of their epinephrine pen and the bee is going to die too because that's what happens to bees when they sting. Yeah. Terribly. You don't want that on your conscience, do you? I don't want it on your conscience. So let me name your dog. In some ways, I stand in awe of Schlechter, or at least his prose. Some of the passages make me long for the coherent, well-composed text on a bottle of Dr. Bronner's Soap. Share this image If these are the illustrations that are going to be included in Schlecter's book, he might want to consider outsourcing. (Via Kickstarter) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) There seems to be little chance that either the book or Schlecter's planned corporate takeover will happen. As of right now, he has $575 pledged out of $3,700. Granted, there are still 23 days left, but at this rate, he's not going to be crossing the billion mark -- or even the million mark -- any time soon. If you feel tempted to help out, whether out of pity or a sense of absurdity, or just because you want your dog to be officially named Donald, here's some advice: Don't. Just don't. Via Mashable and Kickstarter Read more news about dogs on Dogster: Dog Drives Tractor Onto Scotland Highway, Causing Chaos and Twitter Jokes Would You Treat Your Dog With Medical Marijuana Treats? Video of Iranian Dog Killings Sparks Demonstrations Throughout the Country More...
  4. Dog Drives Tractor Onto Scotland Highway, Causing Chaos and Twitter JokesWed, 22 Apr 2015 10:30:00 -0700
    I learned how to drive a tractor before I could drive a car. Back when I was in my teens, I spent a couple of summers working for my grandfather in Ohio, doing a combination of stuff for his electrical contracting business and odd jobs on the 60 acres of land surrounding his house. When I finally got a VW Bug of my own years later, I knew how to use a manual transmission from my time hauling batches of copper cable and mowing large tracts of land. Share this image Sheep dog with flock in field by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) All of which is to say, I have a certain affinity for the dog who made worldwide news today when he grabbed his owner's tractor and drove it onto a highway in Scotland. I would have loved to take one of my grandfather's huge John Deeres onto the local streets. Alas, it was not to be. Probably because I would have wound up doing the same thing to the Ohio roads that Don the sheepdog did to the M74 motorway. The main difference is that the locals wouldn't have thought I was adorable for it. Don was accompanying his owner, Tom Hamilton, while Hamilton checked on lambs in one of his fields near Abington, a village in southern Scotland. While he was on the ground inspecting one of his lambs, Don apparently leaned on the controls of the tractor, sending it careening through a fence and onto the northbound lane of the M74. Share this image Taina Sohlman / Shutterstock.com function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Hamilton told news reporters, "I was out in the mini tractor and had stepped out of it to get a lamb, which looked like it was about to get out of the gate. I had not put the brake on the tractor, and when I turned round I got a fright as the vehicle was careering down the hill, through a gate, and onto the M74." The impromptu trip ended quickly when the tractor smashed into the central divider. The tractor's windshield was shattered, but Don was unharmed, other than being a little shaken up. Traffic, of course, was brought to a standstill. Whoever was in charge of running Traffic Scotland's Twitter account got to send out a truly unique alert: Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) "#M74 (N) J13-RTC due to dog taking control of tractor... nope, not joking. Farmer&police at scene,vehicle in central res. #maycausetailbacks" Naturally, Don's adventure has been very popular on Twitter. At least one person thought that he would be a good replacement for the abrasive Jeremy Clarkson on Top Gear: Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) It's not just me who thinks the dog who drove a tractor on the motorway should be the new Top Gear presenter, right? http://bbc.in/1Pg2mmZ Clarkson, of course, just got fired from the show for assaulting a member of the production staff. Don has so far appeared to be calm and even-tempered, even in a crisis. For the moment, however, Don's motoring adventures seem to be over, leaving in their wake only a broken windshield, a damaged highway divider, and lots of bad puns on Twitter. Via BBC and STV Read more news about dogs on Dogster: Would You Treat Your Dog With Medical Marijuana Treats? Video of Iranian Dog Killings Sparks Demonstrations Throughout the Country Science Says That There Really is Love in Those Puppy Dog Eyes More...
  5. Paris Hilton's Dog Tinkerbell Dies at Age 14Wed, 22 Apr 2015 09:05:00 -0700
    Of all the things Paris Hilton has given the world -- The Simple Life, the phrase "That's hot," a companion for Nicole Ritchie -- none has proved more enduring than the sudden social acceptability of a young woman carrying a little dog around all day in a very expensive handbag.   That dog was Tinkerbell, and she was a mighty Chihuahua, able to withstand the pop of paparazzi flashbulbs, the company of Young Hollywood, and the misty clouds of Paris Hilton by Paris Hilton for Women, the perfume, with equal grace.  Alas, the little dog has died at age 14. Hilton shared the news via Instagram on April 21.   My heart is broken. I am so sad & devastated. After 14 amazing years together, my baby Tinkerbell has passed away of old age. I feel like I've lost a member of my family. She was such a special & incredible soul. We went through so much together. I can't believe she's gone. I will miss her & think about her for the rest of my life. I love you Tinky, you are a Legend & will never be forgotten. #RIPTinkerbell."  She then unleashed a photo tribute to the dog on the site, dedicating her Instagram to Tinkerbell for the day and including many photos through the years of them together. Let's take a look and remember one of the first celebrity dogs:   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 2:58pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 4:15pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 4:53pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 6:56pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 7:09pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 8:12pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 9:31pm PDT   A video posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 21, 2015 at 10:29pm PDT   A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on Apr 22, 2015 at 1:42am PDT   RIP Tinkerbell. See more Pix We Love on Dogster: 50 Bulldogs Vie for Most Beautiful at Drake University SoCal Corgi Beach Day: 634 Corgis Invade Huntington Beach Let These Dogs Show You How to Celebrate Tax Day More...
  6. Would You Treat Your Dog With Medical Marijuana Treats?Tue, 21 Apr 2015 11:05:00 -0700
    It had to happen eventually. As marijuana becomes less stigmatized and moves closer to total legalization, some vendors have started coming out with pot-infused doggie treats. ABC's Good Morning America has a piece profiling some of the leading advocates for giving pot-laced cookies and biscuits to your pooch, especially when they're ill. The point, for the most part, is not to get your pooch stoned, but to provide a natural remedy for various ailments or pain. For San Francisco-based vendor Auntie Dolores, the value in pot comes from cannabidiol -- or CBD -- rather than THC, which is the stuff that's responsible for getting you high. Matthew J. Cote, the brand manager at Auntie Dolores, told ABC that CDB is non-psychoactive and that studies have shown that it's an effective treatment for epilepsy, inflammation, and pain relief. Share this image Dog waiting for biscuit by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) "What we've seen is that some of these dogs respond very rapidly," Cote told ABC. "One woman from Fort Bragg was ready to put down her dog due to how sick and in pain he was, but the day before he was scheduled to go under, she administered our treats and just like that the dog was up, walking around, and acting normally again." In Seattle, Canna Companion markets capsules filled with powdered hemp as a supplement, which they claim may have a number of benefits for dogs, including: May help joint discomfort associated with normal daily exercise and activity Encourages a normal calm demeanor Supports a healthy GI tract Assist in "end of life" care and comfort Maintains healthy neurological function Helps support the immune system The problem is, of course, that while it's certain that smoking a joint isn't going to send you on a Reefer Madness-like rampage, there's still a lot of research to be done on what marijuana's risks and benefits are in medical use. Veterinarians are not allowed to prescribe marijuana to pets, even in states where it's legal, and advocates sometimes over-sell the potential benefits of pot for both humans and animals. Share this image Doctors hand holding medical marijuana by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Pet owners who are thinking about pot treats for their animal companions would be well-advised to do more research than simply looking at the label. Health is a tricky thing. There are no miracle cures or panaceas; what can be an amazing benefit to one patient can be deadly to another. The list of claims by Canna Companion above are an excellent example. They promise a lot, but they're broad and vague. What is "Healthy neurological function," for instance? Claims that something helps support or boost your immune system are always a red flag for me because it's so often used by quacks peddling everything from vitamin C to homeopathy. The fact that on its Facebook page the company highlights an article by Joseph Mercola also makes me skeptical about its standards. Mercola is an infamous "alternative health" guru who, among other things, has claimed that HIV doesn't cause AIDS and has opposed the use of vaccines. None of this means that there's no good in Canna Companion specifically or in marijuana treats generally. But it does demonstrate that you should always be careful when treating your dog's health, and do it in consultation with a veterinarian. One of the big selling points of medical marijuana is that it's "natural," but that doesn't mean that it's harmless. In medicine, there's an old saying that "The dose is the poison," which simply means that anything -- even water or air -- can be toxic in the right dose. Share this image Hand holding marijuana leaf by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) The ABC article points out that the ASPCA has dealt with many cases where dogs and cats have been poisoned because they dug into their owners' pot. Dogs that ingest a large amount need to be taken to the vet and have their heart rate monitored. Tina Wismer, the medical director of the ASPCA Poison Control Center says that the treats being marketed are certainly safer than that, but the effects are still unknown: "Most of these treats have very low levels of CBD, so they are much safer," she told ABC. "It looks like these certainly could be helpful products in some cases, but right now we dont have enough information. Whether its THC or other cannabinoids, the problem is we have no therapeutic dose. We don't know, 'are you underdosing your animal or overdosing your animal?' These are the things we need to determine." We might get great things out of legalizing marijuana, and frankly, it's about time. But it also needs to be treated with the same respect and caution you would give any other drug, whether it be aspirin, Viagra, or specialized neurological or heart medicines. What do you think? Would you give your dog pot biscuits or supplements for their health? Via ABC News Read more news about dogs and marijuana on Dogster: Medical Marijuana May Soon Be Legal for Dogs in Nevada Ask a Vet: Do You Support Medical Marijuana Use in Dogs? Ask a Vet: Did I Kill My Dog With Marijuana? More...
  7. Video of Iranian Dog Killings Sparks Demonstrations Throughout the CountryMon, 20 Apr 2015 10:38:00 -0700
    Iranian animal-rights activists have taken to the streets in several cities throughout the country to protest a grotesque video showing men killing stray dogs. (We're not showing the footage here for obvious reasons.) The video is undated, but went viral within the last week. It allegedly shows dogs dying after being injected with acid by men in the city of Shiraz, about 500 miles south of Tehran. According to the Fars News Agency, the activist who took the video says that the men were paid $4 for each dog killed. Share this image Skyline of Tehran by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) The biggest protest so far took place outside the offices of Vice President Masoumeh Ebtekar in Tehran. On Sunday, at least 500 people gathered outside, demanding an investigation of the video. Ebtekar said in a letter to the Interior Ministry that there needs to be "an immediate end to unconventional population control methods for stray dogs." She also addressed the crowd directly, telling them that "Hurting animals is unacceptable under any circumstances," but that the responsibility for pursuing an investigation falls on the local governments. Demonstrations also took place in the cities of Shiraz, Qazvin, and Karaj. Dog ownership is highly controversial in Iran and many other Muslim societies because certain schools of Islam consider dogs to be unclean. Owning them as pets, rather than as work animals, is especially frowned upon. Share this image Matyas Rehak / Shutterstock.com function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) These feelings about dogs surfaced in Iran late last year, when 32 conservative members of the Iranian parliament signed a draft of a law that would have made walking a dog in public or owning one as a pet punishable by 74 lashes of the whip. In Malaysia, animal activist Syed Azmi Alhabshi got death threats when he organized a public event called "I Want to Touch a Dog," where Muslims could come to touch and pet dogs, many of them for the first time. Share this image Central Asian Shepherd in cage by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Although the taboo runs deep, there is also pushback against it from many Muslims, as the protests against the video show. The response to it has been broad-based; not only has the Vice President had to make an immediate response, but the local government of Shiraz was flooded with phone calls after the video hit the web, and Ali Karimi, a beloved former football star, posted a picture of himself with his two dogs on his Instagram account. Next to the picture, he wrote, "Dogs are the kindest domestic animals. I hope those who, under any excuse, did this to these animals get what they deserve." It's safe to say that we all agree with that sentiment. Via Yahoo News Read more news about dogs on Dogster: Science Says That There Really is Love in Those Puppy Dog Eyes With Bare Hands, Man Fights Off Cougar Attacking Girlfriend's Dog Couple Looking for Lost Dog Threatened With $750,000 Fine More...
  8. 50 Bulldogs Vie for Most Beautiful at Drake UniversityMon, 20 Apr 2015 10:25:00 -0700
    This weekend's 36th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest at Drake University, which kicks off the school's Drake Relays athletic week, featured a record-setting crowd of 1,400 spectators watching 50 Bulldogs compete to be top dog. The contest has been around since 1979 and is considered the oldest event of its kind in the country. Each year, the event receives so many entrants that officials must select contestants from a lottery.   The winner? The handsome Tank, whom Duane Smith adopted from Craigslist last year. "He loves to play tug of war, he's friendly with the neighbors -- he's a great dog," said Smith.  This is Tank:  Share this image (All photos courtesy of Drake University) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) "Tank has just got a great look to him," said judge and Drake University Athletic Director Sandy Hatfield Clubb. "Great coloring, nice stature, that classic Bulldog face with bottom tooth that sticks out just right. And he's kind and gentle, which is equally important." This is some more Tank: Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) The win makes Tank 2015's Beautiful Bulldog and Drake Relays mascot, and his duties require appearances at Drake Relays-related events throughout the week.  Tank won out over a impressive panel of contestants, especially the pirate dog and a bunch of Bulldogs in dresses -- oh, and the Bulldog in the top hat. Hard to imagine anyone beating a Bulldog in a top hat, but here we are.   Enjoy more pictures of the event:  Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Share this image function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) See more Pix We Love on Dogster: SoCal Corgi Beach Day: 634 Corgis Invade Huntington Beach Let These Dogs Show You How to Celebrate Tax Day Look at These Stylish Dogs on Menswear Site Mr. Porter More...
  9. Science Says That There Really is Love in Those Puppy Dog EyesFri, 17 Apr 2015 10:35:00 -0700
    Maybe those great big puppy-dog eyes really do have a purpose other than to provide profits for greeting card companies. This week, Japanese scientists published a paper in the journal Science showing that both humans and dogs respond to those long, loving gazes between species. Is it love? Well, that's an question more suited to poets, but the scientists can at least assure us that there are increases in hormone levels consistent with affection when humans and dogs gaze into each other's eyes. Share this image King Charles Spaniel by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Yeah, I know; that last sentence kind of bleeds every bit of sentiment out of the relationship between humans and animals and makes us both sound like big walking bags of chemicals. But you can at least be assured that when your pup looks up at you with those eyes, it's more than just a cheap attempt to get you to give them some kibble or take them out for a walk. The team, led by Takefumi Kikusui at Azabu University in Japan, watched 30 dogs of various breeds interact with humans. But rather than just watching, the researchers took the next obvious step and had both humans and dogs pee into a cup so that they could measure hormone levels. What they found is that the more the dogs and people stared into each others' eyes, the more concentrated the levels of oxytocin, a chemical that's associated with love, trust, and social bonding. Even better, when they injected the dogs with oxytocin, they gazed into the eyes of their owners even more than before. Share this image Woman with Yorkshire Terrier by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) So what does this mean for dog lovers? Well, it's probably not going to change your relationship with your dog. You loved each other before, and you'll probably continue to do so. However, for those who are interested in such things, it may give some insight into how the relationship between dogs and humans evolved over thousands of years. How did dogs go from hunting and harassing humans to being our best buds? The oxytocin response seems to be one that evolved as part of the bonding between humans and the domestic dogs. When the scientists tried the same thing with wolves, even pairing them with humans who had raised them from pups, there was no similar oxtyocin response. Writing a commentary about the study in the same issue of Science, Evan MacLean and Brian Hare of Duke University's Canine Cognition Center (neither were inolved in the study) say that the results essentially imply that dogs may have evolved to take advantage of our tender feelings towards human children: Nagasawa et al.'s findings suggest that dogs have taken advantage of our parental sensitivities -- using behaviors such as staring into our eyes -- to generate feelings of social reward and caretaking behavior. Because these processes are bidirectional, dogs themselves likely experience similar rewards, ensuring that the feedback loop is propagated. From an evolutionary perspective, the challenge for dogs may simply have been to express a behavioral (and morphological) repertoire that mimicked the cues that elicit caregiving toward our own young. Share this image White Maltese Puppy by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Of course, this is one study based on 30 dogs, and those are pretty broad conclusions. The best rule when interesting new studies like this come out is to mentally make note of the results and wait to see what happens as the scientific community bats them around and does more studies. But it does tell us one thing: If you ever doubted it, your dog is feeling things very similar to you when they look up at you with those big, brown (or blue) eyes. Via Science and LA Times Read more news about dogs on Dogster: With Bare Hands, Man Fights Off Cougar Attacking Girlfriend's Dog Couple Looking for Lost Dog Threatened With $750,000 Fine The Virus Causing the Chicago Dog Flu Outbreak Is New to U.S. More...
  10. Are U.S.-Made Jerky Treats Now Making Dogs Sick?Fri, 17 Apr 2015 09:50:00 -0700
    After years of warnings and complaints against jerky treats made in China -- and the decision of Petco and PetSmart to finally pull the products from store shelves -- we thought we were through with the jerky-treat mess.  It turns out, we're not. Jerky treats made in the U.S. are also now making dogs sick. Vets at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine are diagnosing dogs with acquired Fanconi disease after they ate jerky treats made in the U.S. and got sick, according to Vin News Service.  What's behind it? Well, the working theory is that while the jerky treats themselves are made in the U.S., some of the ingredients involved in making them are from outside the country.  Siobhan DeLancey, of the FDAs Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine, said, We have found some of these products may contain ingredients from outside of the U.S. FDA continues its investigation into these, as well as other, jerky treats potentially linked to illnesses. As incredible as it sounds, it seems like some companies are touting made-in-the-U.S. jerky treats -- and benefiting from all the negative press that China-made treats have been receiving -- while using ingredients from other countries. And the companies might not even know it, as they could be buying their raw ingredients to make the treats from other U.S. companies who are using foreign-made ingredients.  Share this image Bulldog eyeing a tasty treat by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) One of those suspected companies is Spot Farms, which is currently facing inquiry after a two-year-old Yorkshire Terrier turned up sick after eating the company's jerky treats. Dr. Bonnie Werner, an internal medicine specialist at Animal Emergency Medical Center in Torrance, California, says the dog has acquired Fanconi disease, according to Vin News Service, and said she has been in contact with the company.  After being brushed off by a customer service rep, who just kept repeating that all Spot Farms' chickens were from Kentucky and that all of the other ingredients were sourced from U.S. companies, Werner spoke to Vin News Service, who contacted the company and received more information. Julie DeYoung, a spokesperson for Perdue Farms Inc., which owns Spot Farms, said in a written statement: We are deeply saddened to hear of this dogs illness. We [do not know] the circumstances regarding the dogs illness or whether our treats were a factor. What we do know is that we have never received any reports of serious illness since we launched Spot Farms dog treats in 2013. Later she told Vin News Service in a phone call, Were gathering information that will hopefully allow us to evaluate whether our treats are the cause of this illness. Were highly motivated to understand what happened here, and what role, if any, our treats played." Share this image Labrador Retriever at the vet by Shutterstock. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Dr. Urs Giger, director of the Metabolic Genetics Screening Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, who has been investigating Fanconi for decades, highlights the difficulties the new cases put on consumers who want to buy jerky treats.   When youre looking at pet jerky-treat products, and Ive checked shelves at stores, the label does not necessarily say where it came from, Giger told Vin News Service. It [identifies] the company but not where it was manufactured or where the ingredients came from. He says to take the "made in the U.S." label with a grain of salt. One would have to check on that very carefully, as manufacturers may have sourced ingredients through third parties." Via Vin News Service Read more dog news on Dogster: Police Find Chihuahua in Car Wreckage Two Days After Crash SoCal Corgi Beach Day: 634 Corgis Invade Huntington Beach Dogs Dine at a High-End, Organic Pop-Up Restaurant in London More...
Balancing Dog
google gadget